half-hardy


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  • adj

Words related to half-hardy

(of plants) requiring protection from frost

References in periodicals archive ?
Mid: Start mowing the lawn regularly and apply lawn weed and feed, plant new roses, trees, shrubs and perennials, feed specimen trees, roses, shrubs and hedge and established beds and borders with a general purpose organic fertiliser, prick out half-hardy annual seedlings or pot them up as necessary.
Ensure tender and half-hardy fuchsias, remaining dormant in pots, do not become completely dry.
Make sure that tender and half-hardy fuchsias, remaining dormant in their pots, do not become completely dry.
Plant out half-hardy annuals such as Aster, Cosmos, Nico-tiana, Phlox, Verbena and Zinnia as soon as possible.
THEY often flower longer and later than other bedding plants, but these elegant half-hardy annuals, which produce large, daisy-like flowers in shades of red, pink and white in summer to autumn, add a splash of colour to the border.
These are half-hardy plants, particularly suitable for sunny, exotic gardens or a planting scheme based on `hot' colours.
It is only half-hardy so needs to be kept frost-free over winter in a greenhouse or porch.
We're sowing marigolds, cornflowers, love-inthe-mist and half-hardy annuals such as nicotiana.
Sow seed of slow-maturing half-hardy bedding plants including pelargoniums, begonias and verbenas, in heated propagators.
Sow seed of slow-maturing half-hardy summer bedding plants including pelargoniums, begonias and verbenas, in heated propagators.
Highly effective in patio containers on a sunny patio and half-hardy, they'll produce a rhizome at the end of the season that can be dug up and stored frost-free over winter.
Pot up half-hardy fuchsias and take them under cover, storing them with other tender perennials or keeping them in a cool room.
Plant out hardened off tender and half-hardy fuchsias into beds, borders and containers.
In a sunny, sheltered spot, plant out half-hardy climbers such as ipomoea (morning glory), cobaea scandens (cup and saucer plant) and eccremocarpus scaber (Chilean glory vine).
FREESIAS produce the most fantastic scent and yet many gardeners are reluctant to have a go with these tender or half-hardy bulbs, which are commonly grown under cover to provide cut flowers early in the year.