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  • noun

Words related to half-caste

an offensive term for the offspring of parents of different races or cultures

References in periodicals archive ?
Until 1921 half-castes were allocated to the Maori or European population depending on their mode of living.
She was living with her family in the bush near Halls Creek when 'the government came for me and my brother, the half-castes, and left the two full-blood children'.
Rather the Colonial Office favoured a "formula which would make the legal status of native half-castes depend in effect upon the standards and manner of their life" and suggested that this policy should be adopted uniformly by the governments of all the East African colonies.
The story begins its twists and turns when Celanire arrives in Guadeloupe as a teacher for the Home of Half-Castes.
Only Celanire had been appointed to teach at the Home for Half-Castes some thirty miles away in Adjame-Santey.
The number of half-castes, though, are rapidly increasing and threatening the political ideal of a White Australia.
Under his direction, religious fundamentalists and Social Darwinists are made to rub shoulders with aboriginal half-castes, imperial officials, rogue sailors, petty thieves, vicious convicts and even the occasional innocent in the everchanging world of the first half of the 19th century.
Every endeavour is being made to breed out colour by elevating female half-castes to the white standard with a view to their absorption by mating into the white population.
State parliament has just enacted legislation including the grant to the Commissioner for Native Affairs of control over the marriages of half-castes.
According to the Times, 'He suggested that decent clean-living half-castes should be allowed to play.
23) However, as 90 per cent of the sexual unions were then among `coloured people', rather than between `coloureds' and `whites', and were to an increasing extent with `full-bloods', instead of miscegenation aiding the process of biological absorption it was having the undesirable effect of `pushing the half-castes back to the Aborigines' (Hasluck 1936:5, 6).
of the provision, I think that half-castes should be
Tindale, in his `Survey of the Half-caste Problem of South Australia', a heavily annotated copy of which Neville owned and which he cites elsewhere in Australia's Coloured Minority, describes a vastly complicated system of racial interbreeding that runs from 1/8 `blood' through to 7/8 `blood', with multiple generational differences (1941:85-6).