hagiographer


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  • noun

Synonyms for hagiographer

the author of a worshipful or idealizing biography

References in periodicals archive ?
As artists in the late fifteenth century built upon the work of earlier hagiographers, we again find that questions of dramatic narrative trumped any concern for judicial authentication.
Written in 1945, the piece reads in part as though it was written by a hagiographer, an apologist, and a friend.
He minds the many pitfalls of his art, Wary of biographers who err In idolizing, tearing men apart, Iconoclast or hagiographer.
According to one hagiographer, he was a "simple laborer .
Historians have been at pains to explain the very late baptism of Constantine the Great since the time of his hagiographer, Eusebius.
Art, for Louis-Combet, bears the only hope of filling the void: the narrators of this author's mythobiographies often occupy the role of the latter-day hagiographer while documenting their own loss of faith.
Yeats wrote some baroque poetry in the nineteenth century and in The Winding Stair (1933) returned to questions of miracles, the sacred, and the body before blessing and dismissing the hagiographer, Von Hiigel.
Characteristically, Jacobus, the Roman Catholic hagiographer, repudiates this question of sexual generosity by replacing it with virgin martyrdom, while Spenser, the Protestant poet, repudiates adulterous eroticism by showing instead virtuous maternal fecundity.
First, this paper is an examination of how a hagiographer, Onesime Boyer, worked to create a saint cult that ultimately ended in failure.
Aware of Wolfe's faults as man and writer, Mauldin is not a hagiographer.
Bampfylde, of A History of Sarawak under its two White Rajahs, 1839-1908 (1909), the Reverend Sabine Baring-Gould, novelist, hagiographer, hymn-writer, and collector of folksongs.
Michael Munn's style as a biographer is that of the hagiographer.
Hirst hagiographer Gordon Burn, for example, could write romantically of the millionaire, restaurant-owning pop-impresario artist in The Guardian as late as April 2000 that "he has always used drugs and drink as a way of isolating himself from banal experience and to bring him to something original or extraordinary in the moment that nobody else can see.
This latest effort by priest and hagiographer Holbock complements earlier dictionaries of saints.