haematopoiesis


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  • noun

Synonyms for haematopoiesis

the formation of blood cells in the living body (especially in the bone marrow)

References in periodicals archive ?
Defective globin chains lead to excessive haemolysis and compensatory haematopoiesis within bone marrow, which in turn leads to enlargement of the medullary cavities and thinning of cortices.
The liver, spleen, kidney, posterior mediastinum and lymph nodes are the most common sites of extramedullary haematopoiesis.
On plain chest radiography, thoracic extramedullary haematopoiesis lesions appear as smooth or lobulated posterior mediastinal masses.
On non-contrast computed tomography (CT) scanning, extramedullary haematopoiesis lesions appear as soft tissue masses that are denser than fat.
3) However, mixture of blood products of different age within the extramedullary haematopoiesis foci results in increased or decreased T1 or T2 signal.
7 UN/31 5/0 Areas of infarct, foci of extramedullary haematopoiesis, polymorph infiltrate suggestive of ischaemic changes with possible chorioamnionitis.
Mutations in ELA2, encoding neutrophil elastase, define a 21-day biological clock in cyclic haematopoiesis.
Bone marrow is the site of haematopoiesis in adults.
Together, these observations strongly suggest that osteogenesis and haematopoiesis are functionally linked.
An essential prerequisite for the development of normal haematopoiesis in the bone marrow is endochondral ossification (90-92) which provides a crucial interrelationship between ossification and maturation of haematopoietic processes in mammals.
In patients with chronic cardiac diseases, sequestration of iron in macrophages (consequent to chronic diseases) makes this nutrient unavailable for haematopoiesis.
Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal haematologic disorders characterized clinically and morphologically by ineffective haematopoiesis (1).