habit

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Synonyms for habit

Synonyms for habit

the physical or constitutional characteristics of a person

clothing worn by members of a religious order

Synonyms

Synonyms for habit

an established custom

Synonyms

Related Words

(psychology) an automatic pattern of behavior in reaction to a specific situation

a distinctive attire worn by a member of a religious order

the general form or mode of growth (especially of a plant or crystal)

attire that is typically worn by a horseback rider (especially a woman's attire)

References in classic literature ?
The unconscious desire is in no way mysterious; it is the natural primitive form of desire, from which the other has developed through our habit of observing and theorizing (often wrongly).
Now the saving of a large and complex structure, when rendered superfluous by the parasitic habits of the Proteolepas, though effected by slow steps, would be a decided advantage to each successive individual of the species; for in the struggle for life to which every animal is exposed, each individual Proteolepas would have a better chance of supporting itself, by less nutriment being wasted in developing a structure now become useless.
Habit is hereditary with plants, as in the period of flowering, in the amount of rain requisite for seeds to germinate, in the time of sleep, &c.
That habit or custom has some influence I must believe, both from analogy, and from the incessant advice given in agricultural works, even in the ancient Encyclopaedias of China, to be very cautious in transposing animals from one district to another; for it is not likely that man should have succeeded in selecting so many breeds and sub-breeds with constitutions specially fitted for their own districts: the result must, I think, be due to habit.
On the whole, I think we may conclude that habit, use, and disuse, have, in some cases, played a considerable part in the modification of the constitution, and of the structure of various organs; but that the effects of use and disuse have often been largely combined with, and sometimes overmastered by, the natural selection of innate differences.
These birds in many respects resemble in their habits the Carranchas.
I have now mentioned all the carrion-feeders, excepting the condor, an account of which will be more appropriately introduced when we visit a country more congenial to its habits than the plains of La Plata.
Negro, in Northern Patagonia, there is an animal of the same habits, and probably a closely allied species, but which I never saw.
It is remarkable that some of the species, but not all, both of the Cuckoo and Molothrus, should agree in this one strange habit of their parasitical propagation, whilst opposed to each other in almost every other habit: the molothrus, like our starling, is eminently sociable, and lives on the open plains without art or disguise: the cuckoo, as every one knows, is a singularly shy bird; it frequents the most retired thickets, and feeds on fruit and caterpillars.
She had regained her riding habit and calash from the grisly phantom, and was, in all respects, the lovely woman who had been sitting by my side at the instant of our overturn.
In what manner, pray, can a hound distinguish the habits, species, or even the genus of an animal, like reasoning, learned, scientific, triumphant man
So are we too fixated on breaking bad habits for just a short time, whilst ignoring the fact that for things to improve permanently, we need to replace bad with good habits?
Thus, New Year's resolutions are a matter of breaking old habits and forming new ones.
O'Neill said, 'If I could start disrupting the habits around one thing, it would spread throughout the entire company.
The parents of the children in both the groups were administered a questionnaire that included questions about the children's demographic information and previous or persistent oral habits.