guarani


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  • noun

Words related to guarani

the basic unit of money in Paraguay

a member of the South American people living in Paraguay and Bolivia

the language spoken by the Guarani of Paraguay and Bolivia

References in periodicals archive ?
The Brazilian state-run oil company has the largest debt load of any oil major in the world and is trying to overcome a massive corruption scandal, so there was doubt in the sugar sector if it would complete its investment in Guarani.
During and after the war, the Guarani language was bolstered to the extent that Paraguay is the only country in the Western Hemisphere where a majority of the population speaks one indigenous language, Guarani, which is enshrined in the Constitution, giving it official equality with the language of European colonization, Spanish.
Veron's story is one that has played out in some form across the lands of the Guarani as cattle ranchers and sugarcane farmers encroach further and further every year.
So far, Guarani has processed 16 million tonnes of sugar cane, the executive revealed.
The Guarani is the largest group of indigenous people in the Amazon, with 46,000 living across seven states.
Branwen Niclas, 41 from Bangor, visited and lived with the indigenous Guarani tribe in the coastal Mata Atlantica forest in Brazil last month.
And in Brazil the Guarani de Juazeirom club were also made to fork out a fine after a Horizonte player was hit by a chicken drumstick, which the match official managed to recover and post to the authorities with his match report.
The official languages are Portuguese, Guarani and Spanish.
An ethnobotanical study was performed of the ferns and lycophytes used by the Guarani of Misiones Province, Argentina.
Este poema, junto con dos otros, "El primer hombre" y "Nacimiento de Kuna," forma parte de una especie de trilogia sobre el tema de la creacion guarani del mundo.
Works translated into Spanish and English from Classical Nahuatl, Quechua, various dialects of Maya, Mbya Guarani, Mapundungun, and Mazatec--many transcribed or printed for the first time in any language--contribute a refreshing dimension to this new panorama of Latin American poetry.
Also launched was a Quechua university, called Casimiro Huanca University (named after an assassinated coca-producer union leader), in the central province of Cochabamba; and a Guarani university, called Apiaguaiki Tupa University, (named after a nineteenth century Guarani rebel leader), in the southern province of Chuquisaca.
Bret Gustafson delivers a riveting ethnographic account of grassroots activism on the part of the Guarani people of lowland Bolivia in New Languages of the State.
According to a recent report produced by Survival International, the Guarani in Brazil have lost much of their land to sugar cane cultivation as a result of the growth of the country's ethanol industry.