gregariously


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Synonyms for gregariously

in a gregarious manner

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References in periodicals archive ?
Anthophora abrupta Say (Hymenoptera: Apidae), also called the chimney or miner bee, nests gregariously in clay or adobe substrate in the eastern half of the U.
Larvae feed gregariously inside the cladodes of many species of Opuntia, often causing death of the plants (Starmer et al.
The vast majority of Neotropical woody bamboos flower gregariously and monocarpically at intervals of from 30 to 40 years (a few species have shorter cycles or nearly always have some individuals in bloom) (Judziewicz et al.
Festive postmodern towers rose cheek to jowl beside sleek black cubes with dark tinted windows, much as Gothic and Art Deco skyscrapers huddled gregariously in the 1920s.
Further, the larvae settle gregariously on hard substrate, including on conspecific shells, making settlers easy to locate.
Once established on mega-rippled sands, mussels settle gregariously as do blue mussels (McGrath et al.
Though wisdom comes slowly in Lopez's cosmology, it only comes through living an examined life where we embrace our fears as gregariously as we embrace our finest moments.
A heartwarming picturebook, with simple but gregariously colorful illustrations, especially recommended for reading aloud and sharing with young children anticipating a brand new sibling.
Peace in Chad and Sudan is gregariously peace for Africa.
Front doors open gregariously onto the shared pleasure of an enclosed garden, sometimes gated.
Larvae feed gregariously inside the cladodes of many species of Opuntia (Cactaceae), often facilitating secondary pathogenic infections and, eventually, death of the plant (Starmer et al.
Males and females of these small, arrhenotokous, gregariously developing parasitoids differ from each other in color, wing size, eye structure, and gross morphology.
The larvae feed gregariously inside cladodes, often introducing secondary infections by microbial pathogens which lead to plant death (Starmer et al.