horned owl

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Their range overlaps with the great horned owl, which can become a predator of the barred owl by eating its eggs, young, and even the adults.
Murtaugh explained that the great horned owl is our earliest breeding bird, on the nest as early as January.
In the Kluane Lake region (Yukon, Canada), roost site selection of alpine-breeding Great Horned Owls varied with black fly activity (Rohner et al.
Great Horned Owls are mostly nocturnal, earning the nickname "Tigers of the Night," though some do hunt in daylight.
Diet and trophic characteristics of Great Horned Owls in southwestern Idaho.
Like all raptors, or birds of prey, great horned owls use their feet instead of their beaks to capture prey.
Nevertheless, Baker (1962) found owls, specifically Great Horned Owls (Bubo virginianus), to be one of the least effective avian predators near a cave in New Mexico.
Abstract: Pharmacokinetic data were determined after a single dose of meloxicam in red-tailed hawks (RTH; Buteo jamaicensis) and great horned owls (GHO; Bubo virginianus).
Sign up for a three-hour excursion into Black Canyon, with a chance to spot bighorn sheep and great horned owls along the way.
To solve the puzzle, the Johns Hopkins team studied the bone structure and complex vasculature in the heads and necks of snowy, barred and great horned owls after their deaths from natural causes.
We examined habitat preferences (river versus pond) of great horned owls (Bubo virginianus), eastern screech-owls (Megascops asio), elf owls, lesser nighthawks, common poorwills (Phalaenoptilus nuttallii), and common pauraques (Nyctidromus albicollis) by determining presence and absence for each species at each of the 19 sites (evaluated for each species using a two by two chi-square test).
Bernie Krause reports on research that finds a cohesive chorus of frogs vocalizing in a synchronous relationship to one another is a key factor in escaping from predators such as coyotes and great horned owls.
But one noise that sounds sort of like a scream is made by great horned owls.
When he wrote about robins, Reba from west Texas wrote about great horned owls and bald eagles.