gratification

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  • noun

Synonyms for gratification

Synonyms for gratification

state of being gratified or satisfied

References in periodicals archive ?
Based on Uses and Gratifications framework, we argue that Chinese viewers who watch Hollywood movies might be drawn to the movies because of preexisting special interests in American culture, or they might be more receptive of the American way of life and American values.
Furthermore, one important reason that the Uses and Gratifications framework is more relevant to the study is because the participants satisfied what Blumler and Katz (1974) called as active audiences.
Therefore, even though the data from this study seemed to show more support for a Uses and Gratifications framework, a lifetime of exposure to media content is a variable worth examining in future studies.
Just because the Uses and Gratifications model was found to be more plausible to this study does not mean that less stereotypical perceptions leads participants to watch more Hollywood movies.
It offers an explanation for these dynamics based primarily on the Uses and Gratifications framework.
Understand the misunderstanding: A study incorporating Uses and Gratification Theory on why Chinese film audiences see America the way they do (Master's thesis).
Consequently, preservice teachers, who engage in self-regulation of learning, are those who display competence, high self-efficacy beliefs, willingness to delay gratification, and proactive positions on the learning process.
From the theoretical notions and empirical findings discussed above, the researchers derived the following four hypotheses: (1) teachers' self-efficacy beliefs, academic self-efficacy beliefs, intrinsic interest, academic delay of gratification, and self-regulation of learning will be positively related to each other and to academic performance (i.
The researchers used an adapted version of the scale developed by Bembenutty and Karabenick (1998) to assess academic delay of gratification through ten scenarios (Bembenutty, 2005).
Students with higher teacher self-efficacy beliefs scores were those more willing to engage in academic delay of gratification (r = .
01), as were intrinsic interest and academic delay of gratification and academic self-regulation (r = .
Preservice teachers' academic self-efficacy beliefs and intrinsic interest were entered first, followed by academic delay of gratification and academic self-regulation.
Another hierarchical regression analysis was conducted to examine the extent to which motivational beliefs and academic self-regulation predicted preservice teachers' academic delay of gratification (Hypothesis 3).
Teachers' self-efficacy beliefs, academic self-efficacy beliefs, and intrinsic interest were entered first, followed by academic delay of gratification and academic self-regulation.
Taken together, the results revealed a high correlation between the students' motivational beliefs, willingness to delay gratification, and use of self-regulated learning strategies.