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Synonyms for gut

Synonyms for gut

Synonyms for gut

the part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anus

a narrow channel or strait

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a strong cord made from the intestines of sheep and used in surgery

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empty completely

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remove the guts of

References in periodicals archive ?
In truth, of course, one cannot separate "big" from "little" in physics, because the search for a Grand Unified Theory involves trying to marry the bizarre world of quantum physics with the slightly less bizarre world of the universe that we can see.
Bubble has developed an interest in theoretical physics, and is believed to be on the verge of unveiling his Grand Unified Theory.
AS INSPIRATION FOR DEVELOPING A comprehensive, unified, explanatory theory of librarianship, the author makes an analogy to the unification of the fundamental forces of nature, beginning with the Copernican revolution, followed by the discoveries of Kepler, Galileo, Newton, and Einstein, and the unification of electro-magnetism, light, the weak force, the electroweak force, the strong force, and the ultimate goal to include gravity, space, time, and relativity into a single grand unified theory.
In a similar daunting research challenge a decade ago, researchers created a computer capable of simulating the grand unified theory of quantum electrodynamics, what physicists see as the standard theory of the forces of nature.
This was being done, though it required several sets of modifications to make such a Grand Unified Theory (GUT) work, and it is still not entirely satisfactory today.
Einstein spent most of his later years searching for such a theory, and although he was unsuccessful, the search for a grand unified theory, or "Theory of Everything," has captured the imagination of many of the world's foremost scientists (Davies 1984, Riordan and Schramm 1991).
Both of these cases are an illustration of the deep commitment that economists seem to have to a single, grand unified theory of all economic phenomena.
As Stephen would so poetically put it, if scientists could come up a grand unified theory that explained both these fields, we would truly understand everything: we would finally "know the mind of God.
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