grammarian


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  • noun

Synonyms for grammarian

a linguist who specializes in the study of grammar and syntax

References in classic literature ?
is doubtless clearer the grammarians than it is to the author of this
Sayeed Nawaz as Grammarian, Syed Abdul Hamid as Timer and Mohammed Abdul Hameed as Listening Master.
She also points out his Provencal glosses, explores his relation to earlier and contemporary exegetes, and describes his role as a grammarian.
These data, comprising a huge pre-Islamic lexicon, enlarged by Islamic neologisms, and an enormous repertoire of morphological and syntactic structures, inevitably had to be taken on trust from a small group of revered individuals, and there was no systematic corroboration of the kind which would develop with the Hadlth: it was only much later that the grammarian Ibn al-Anbari (d.
Likewise, Priestley felt that although languages change by being used, the language scholar, and especially the grammarian, had a leading role in the maturation process of the English language (Straaijer 2011: 174).
Hodson's strategy is to analyze selected features of usage in texts discussed in her book as if she were a grammarian of the Romantic period.
She's renowned for her precise, exquisite prose, but new research shows Jane Austen was a poor speller and erratic grammarian who got a big helping hand from her editor.
The tenth-century grammarian Dunash ben Labrat explains that the word is related to the Aramaic man, meaning "who.
Of special note is the inclusion of a language-change index based on grammarian, lexicographer, and editor Bryan A.
Meetings are held fortnightly where participants practice and learn skills by filling a meeting role, ranging from giving a prepared speech or an impromptu one to serving as timer, evaluator or a grammarian.
His early Flat crops yielded the four-time Irish St Leger hero Vinnie Roe, also winner of the Prix Royal-Oak, and the Group 2 winners Lochbuie and Grammarian.
Sarah Young took the Head Teacher's Award and Cecelia Wood received The Grammarian Scholarship.
French grammarian Dominique Bouhours who died in 1702: "I am about to - or I am going to - die: either expression is correct.
The evidence he proposes ranges from the arresting revelation that medieval scholars associated dactylic feet (which are prominent in Browning's poem) with the male genitalia and that the kinds of grammatical particles in which the grammarian is interested can be read as encoding homosexual tendencies, to a predictable reading of the speaker's use of the term "erect" and the rather unconvincing claim that the text is "blatantly reticent" (p.
She combined the skills of a painstaking researcher with the discernment of a master grammarian.