gossiper


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Related to gossiper: rumormonger
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for gossiper

Synonyms for gossiper

a person given to gossiping and divulging personal information about others

References in periodicals archive ?
It's almost as though the gossiper is engaging in self-disclosure.
Humor and laughter in Austen's letters connect us to her and to one another, as whiners, as depreciators, as gossipers, as well as lovers of the way words make us laugh--and especially so when those words are Jane Austen's.
In the case of a values conflict," she continues, "the best solution may be to simply ignore the gossiper or to encourage him or her to move on.
With tongue wildly wagging, the gossiper takes them past some of the buildings in the center of the village and tells what really goes on inside them.
Constructive Chatter: If you are surrounded by negative personalities--the brownnoser, gossiper, or tattler--commit to avoiding negative conversations one day a week.
She called the vice-president "corrupt, an extortionist, incompetent, a gossiper, a liar and ungrateful," adding that she was "power-hungry, daft, foolish, divisive and a disgrace.
This teapot is the gossiper suggested in the title, the one member of the group fidgeting, as though vibrating from the juicy information it contains.
The actress apparently happens to be quite a gossiper too.
He was the longest-serving editor of "The Gossiper," the Telegram & Gazette inhouse newspaper.
Ask the gossiper, "How would you feel if you were the subject of the gossip?
com/ now to play games, check out the weather at the North Pole, read Santa's blog, watch the reindeer, and read the North Pole Gossiper.
And, whether it is right or wrong if it shifts the market in a way that suits the gossiper, he is meant to be in trouble regardless.
So a gentle gossip is par for the course of life and quite enjoyable but really personal, venomous stuff is now making me think that the gossiper is the problem not the subject.
In the session, Podesta explored the differences between men and women, touched on marriage and parenting, and then moved into the workplace to describe the whiner, tattler, gossiper, complainer, and the employee who says, "That's not my job.
Meanwhile magazine Marianne found the book distasteful, and the former president as just another gossiper.