gloss

(redirected from glossed)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to glossed: glossed over
  • all
  • noun
  • verb
  • phrase

Synonyms for gloss

Synonyms for gloss

a radiant brightness or glow, usually due to light reflected from a smooth surface

to give a gleaming luster to, usually through friction

to give a deceptively attractive appearance to

gloss over: to conceal or make light of a fault or offense

Synonyms for gloss

an explanation or definition of an obscure word in a text

Synonyms

Related Words

an alphabetical list of technical terms in some specialized field of knowledge

Synonyms

Related Words

provide interlinear explanations for words or phrases

Related Words

provide an interlinear translation of a word or phrase

give a deceptive explanation or excuse for

References in periodicals archive ?
First of all, the self-initiated task of creating a gloss is a cognitive act that involves the learner emotionally--active participation in the learning process contributes to processing lexical information about the glossed item; hence better retention.
Findings (figures are in %) a) Practice of learner glossing A 96 B 92 C 93 D 66 b) Words glossed New & Only Only new difficult important A 58 34 8 B 23 68 9 C 9 64 7 D 26 44 30 c) Language used for glossing Group L1 L2 L1 + L2 A 100 0 0 B 100 0 0 C 100 0 0 D 43 37 20 d) Frequency of glossing Always Often Rarely A 46 46 8 B 23 59 18 C 71 22 7 D 10 54 36 e) Place Over Margin Elsewhere A 52 42 6 B 86 9 5 C 82 14 4 D 58 42 0
On the Jewish side, we need only to document the exegetical precedents for fray Luis' Spanish glossed translation, whereas on the Christian side, a stronger claim is made: namely, that most Christian exegetes of the Song, whose works should have been more readily accessible to the Augustinian friar, completely ignored the literal sense of this verse in the Hebrew original, relying on the Latin and Greek translations even for their interpretations of its "literal" meaning, and hence, could not have served as his source on this particular issue.
The Bevington edition, on the whole, seems in fact to be the most fully glossed, spotting difficulties that the other editions ignore, as in "Be it lawful I take up what's cast away" (King of France in King Lear, 1.