gig

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  • noun

Synonyms for gig

Synonyms for gig

a commitment, as for a performance by an entertainer

Synonyms for gig

long and light rowing boat

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an implement with a shaft and barbed point used for catching fish

a cluster of hooks (without barbs) that is drawn through a school of fish to hook their bodies

tender that is a light ship's boat

small two-wheeled horse-drawn carriage

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a booking for musicians

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
At that moment the gig was on the point of turning a corner into a dark pine-wood; but just ere it disappeared,--was it fancy?
It never occurred to me till the following day that I might have been able to track her by the wheel-marks of the gig on the dusty summer road.
And with that Macfarlane took his departure and drove off up the wynd in his gig to get under cover before daylight.
When they reached their journey's end the gig was housed, the horse was fed and comforted, and the two young doctors in a private room sat down to the best dinner and the best wine the house afforded.
I like to have the seat in my gig at liberty for any gentleman whom for business reasons I may wish to take down to the hall for a night or so.
Otherwise I do not go; and as for the gig, you may take me or leave me, as you choose.
Waule's gig--the last yellow gig left, I should think.
Father's off with the governor in the gig, and the runners in hiding outside are in full cry after them.
We'll start from here as if we were both going to the railway; and I'll drop you at the foot-path, in the gig.
The gig did not overtake me: and it was well I had not waited for it; vexatious rather, that I had been fool enough to wait so long.
Windows were open, an elderly woman was hanging out clothes in the back yard, and the doctor's gig stood under the porte-cochere.
Tell him, when he theeth that gig clothe by, to jump down, and it'll take him off at a rattling pathe.
Giles was apparently considering the propriety of indulging in a respectful smile himself, when a gig drove up to the garden-gate: out of which there jumped a fat gentleman, who ran straight up to the door: and who, getting quickly into the house by some mysterious process, burst into the room, and nearly overturned Mr.
He had no sooner released his hold, than the man entered to announce that the gig was ready.
Tulliver stood with her arms open; Maggie jumped first on one leg and then on the other; while Tom descended from the gig, and said, with masculine reticence as to the tender emotions, "Hallo