giant hornet

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  • noun

Synonyms for giant hornet

European hornet introduced into the United States


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References in periodicals archive ?
48,450 for the detection and mitigation of the Asian giant hornet and other invasive vespa species
ASIAN GIANT HORNET FACTS | The Asian giant hornet |(vespa mandarinia) is the world's largest hornet which can grow up to 7.
Biologists said Asian giant hornet, which can grow up to 5cm (2ins) in length and has a 5mm long sting, was most likely the culprit.
Joy | Dehany with her daughter Rosie and (above) the giant hornet they found in their garden
The Asian giant hornet is most commonly found in mountainous areas of Japan as well as China, Korea, Taiwan, Nepal, India and Sri Lanka but reached Europe in 2004 - most likely in a consignment of Chinese plant pots.
a giant hornet so deadly, locals call it the 'Yak Killer'; * a beetle that buries birds and small rodents in subterranean crypts to feed its offspring; * an endangered jumping mouse; * and several new species of amphibians, insects and ants.
They found that when a giant hornet with unstingably tough armor barges into a nest, several hundred defenders surround it.
In fact, this ploy accounts for Apis cerana japonica's impressive record of protecting its nest against attacks by the giant hornet, Vespa mandarinia japonica.
Arthur Bird with giant hornet he captured in his garden (above) and how it measures up against a ruler (left).
AGGRESSIVE ATTACK A feared and venomous giant hornet devours a honeybee DEADLY The Asian giant hornet kills about 40 people each year
THIS is a giant hornet," the narrator of Natural Worlds warned.
A mother and son died in China after being surrounded by a swarm of the 5cm-long Asian giant hornets.
Two of the victims were a mum and son who died after being targeted by a swarm of the ferocious insects - believed to be Asian giant hornets.
SWARMS of giant hornets are on their way to Britain after attempts to trap and poison them in France failed.
Bees inside the bail can apparently cope with the smothering heat and low oxygen levels, but the high temperature appears to make giant hornets, Vespa mandarinia japonica, less tolerant of cranked-up carbon dioxide levels.