generic noun


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  • noun

Words related to generic noun

a noun that does not specify either masculine or feminine gender

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In the 1979 edition of the Elements of Style, Strunk and White used generic nouns and pronouns throughout the book, (55) commenting in one section that "style not only reveals the spirit of the man but reveals his identity, as surely as would his fingerprints.
Each new generation of speakers has to establish whether nesto is morphosyntactically a generic noun or an indefinite pronoun.
Both of these are processes of types typically associated with the change of GENERIC NOUN > INDEFINITE PRONOUN, but lead to the reverse outcome.
A second case of this type of degrammaticalization comes from the history of Welsh, and again involves the emergence of a generic noun.
Generic nouns such as 'thing' or 'person' frequently give rise historically to indefinite (unknown-specific) pronouns such as 'someone', 'something' or 'somewhere'.
4) In English, for instance, each of the above-mentioned three types of generic noun phrases is ambiguous in the sense that they may be associated with a generic interpretation and one or more nongeneric interpretations: in addition to the generic reading, the definite singular phrase is associated with a specific/definite reading, the indefinite singular phrase with a specific/indefinite and a nonspecific/indefinite ("attributive" or "narrow-scope") reading, and the bare plural phrase may likewise carry a specific/indefinite and a nonspecific/indefinite interpretation; cf.
It should also not go unmentioned that a number of interesting contrastive studies on encoding and interpreting generic noun phrases or on the question of distinguishing between different types of generic sentences have appeared.
Since topics display a strong association to definiteness in that topic noun phrases usually contain a definite determiner (with the exception of proper names) in article languages, Lee makes the following additional claim: the bare-plural form in English is definite when used as a generic noun phrase in topic position.
In more recent works on genericity, a distinction has usually been made between "generic noun phrases" (which do not necessarily have to occur in generic sentences) and "generic sentences" (which do not necessarily have to contain a generic noun phrase) (cf.
Behrens 2000) use so-called "topic markers" with generic noun phrases.
QUALITY-marking languages highlight the fact that the referents of generic noun phrases should not be considered as individual entities (OBJECTS) but as abstract representatives of certain properties (QUALITY) characterizing kinds.
The cross-linguistic investigation of indefinite determiners in generic noun phrases in particular suggests the usefulness of even finer subclassifications, especially within the area of descriptive generalizations.
QUALITY-marking languages highlight the fact that the referents of generic noun phrases are not to be considered as individual entities (OBJECTS) but as abstract representatives of certain properties (QUALITY) characterizing kinds.
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