gene-splicing


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • noun

Synonyms for gene-splicing

the technology of preparing recombinant DNA in vitro by cutting up DNA molecules and splicing together fragments from more than one organism

References in periodicals archive ?
The NSABB cited the gene-splicing precedent in its avian flu recommendation, saying, "We believe that this is another Asilomar-type moment for public health and infectious-disease research that urgently needs our attention.
Indeed, many more such varieties have been developed using a "conventional" method called mutation-breeding than with gene-splicing.
By using gene-splicing techniques to introduce the two genes that express these enzymes, the pathway is restored and the rice grains accumulate therapeutic amounts of beta-carotene.
The authors argue that because we have no examples of harm from gene-spliced crops (now grown on more than 100 million hectares in the form of corn, cotton, and soybean), we should go to a risk-based regulation and abandon a uniform precautionary principle that treats all gene-splicing events equally.
As long as you stay away from the gene-splicing itself, there is some useful knowledge.
The lab technique, gene-splicing (see "How to put a vitamin in rice", below), lets scientists transplant genes from almost any organism into another: Fish genes can be woven into strawberries, virus genes slipped into bananas.
The discovery of gene-splicing techniques some 30 years ago was heralded as a signal advance for the future of medicine, agriculture, and other applications.
Yet the issues are as well understood as gene-splicing.
The Home Gene-Splicing Kit lets you take body parts (such as a nose, a mouth, eyes and a head of other humans and animals) to create your own mutant.
The new research simply speeds up the process with gene-splicing.
Musical masalah: The world has finally caught up with the musical gene-splicing experiments of Stereolab.
Researchers are using gene-splicing technology to try to grow a beefier tomato they hope will save the makers of ketchup, tomato paste and soup millions of dollars in processing costs.
Michels claims that Monterey - which will see IBM, SCO and Sequent gene-splicing their Unix offerings to offer one 64-bit and one 32-bit OS optimized for the Intel IA-64 architecture, will give the firms a 50% share of the Unix market.
Silver, a Princeton molecular biology professor, walks the reader step by illuminating step through both the science and social practice of bioengineering for human reproduction, from the first test-tube baby in 1978 to gene-splicing and the possibility of cloning today.
Tiny San Francisco-based Genentech had the medical world bubbling over in '77 - one year after its founding - when its scientists for the first time combined gene-splicing technology with artificial gene synthesis, in effect creating little bacteria "factories" that could churn out exact copies of the desired altered hormone.