gawp

(redirected from gaup)
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Synonyms for gawp

look with amazement

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References in periodicals archive ?
The Anger scale of AQ also correlated with the person component GAR, whereas the correlation with GAUP was non-significant.
Uprising has already figured in two operas and a number of theater works, but the project, 10 years in the making, is an especially personal one for Gaup, who was born in Kautokeino and is a descendant of Aslak Haetta, one of the major players in the story.
Lars Mathis Gaup, the herdsman, indicates with a perfunctory wave that he wants the snowmobile engines turned off.
The latter story proves to be true, and Gaup calls his opposite number.
Just when we're about to dig ourselves into a bivouac, Gaup comes roaring up, smiling broadly: miraculously, his children have rounded up the straying reindeer and they are now gathered safely by the river.
You can even question them if you see them out and about and they don't get upset when you stand back and gaup, snigger or guffaw as they slowly bleed to death.
Pathfinder), a film directed by the Sami Nils Gaup.
Screenplay, Laeta Kalogridis, based on a screenplay by Nils Gaup.
Oscar-nommed Norwegian director Nils Gaup repurposed his widely successful TV thriller "Deadline Torp.
Other pics competing include "The Bridge," co-directed by Gerard Depardieu and Frederic Auburtin and co-starring Depardieu and Carole Bouquet; Italian director Ettore Scola's "The Dinner"; German-French co-production "The Volcano," from helmer Ottokar Runze; and "Miscry Harbour," from Oscar-nominated Norwegian director Nils Gaup.
Opening film is Norwegian-Canadian-Danish co-production "Misery Harbour," directed by Nils Gaup ("The Pathfinder").
Its Competition pics, which vie for the Golden Cariddi best film award, include the Norwegian-Canadian "Misery Harbour," by Nils Gaup ("Pathfinder"); costumers "The Magnetist's Fifth Winter," from Sweden, and "Requiem for a Romantic Woman," from Germany; "The Full Monty" scripter Simon Beaufoy's directing debut, "The Darkest Light"; Tony Kaye's "American History X"; Jacques Doillon's "Little Brothers"; and Russian helmer Valeri Priemykov's "who Else If Not Us?