anthrax

(redirected from gastrointestinal anthrax)
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Related to gastrointestinal anthrax: Anthrax vaccine, inhalation anthrax
  • noun

Synonyms for anthrax

a highly infectious animal disease (especially cattle and sheep)

References in periodicals archive ?
In an initial 1980 publication, Soviet officials attributed the disease outbreak in Sverdlovsk to cutaneous and gastrointestinal anthrax caused by the consumption of contaminated meat.
Gastrointestinal anthrax is rare, but may occur as explosive outbreaks associated with ingestion of infected animals.
As in inhalation disease, multidrug parenteral treatment is recommended initially for oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal anthrax and for cutaneous anthrax with extensive edema or involving the head and neck.
Gastrointestinal anthrax can lead to vomiting, loss of appetite, nausea, and diarrhea; without antibiotics, the death rate is 25 to 60 percent.
II-4 Biological Agents/Diseases with Potential for Biological Warfare II-4 Properties of Biological Agents with Potential for Use as Weapons of Mass Destruction II-5 Anthrax II-6 The Anthrax History II-6 Types of Anthrax II-7 Inhalational AnthraxII-7 Cutaneous Anthrax II-7 Gastrointestinal Anthrax II-7 The Anthrax Symptoms, Treatment, and Vaccination II-7 Smallpox II-8 The Smallpox History II-8 Plague II-9 The Plague History II-9 Types of Plague II-9 Bubonic Plague II-9 Pneumonic Plague II-10 Botulism II-10 Tularemia II-11 The Tularemia HistoryII-12 Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers II-12 Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever II-12 Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever II-13 Lassa Hemorrhagic Fever II-13 Q Fever II-14 Brucellosis II-15 Ricin II-16 Others II-16
In contrast to acquiring the disease through typical routes of infection, leading to cutaneous, inhalation, or gastrointestinal anthrax, these patients became infected by injecting heroin (1-3).
Gastrointestinal anthrax causes abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, fever, bloody diarrhea, and hematemesis.
Depending on the route of pathogen entry, three distinct clinical forms of infection are described: cutaneous (skin), inhalation, and gastrointestinal anthrax infection.
Cutaneous anthrax, the most common manifestation of disease, accounts for 95% of cases, whereas pulmonary and gastrointestinal anthrax are much less common and follow inhalation or ingestion of spores, respectively.
II-4 Biological Agents/Diseases with Potential for Biological Warfare II-4 Properties of Biological Agents with Potential for Use as Weapons of Mass Destruction II-5 Anthrax II-6 The Anthrax History II-6 Types of Anthrax II-7 Inhalational Anthrax II-7 Cutaneous Anthrax II-7 Gastrointestinal Anthrax II-7 The Anthrax Symptoms, Treatment, and Vaccination II-7 Smallpox II-8 The Smallpox History II-8 Plague II-9 The Plague History II-9 Types of Plague II-9 Bubonic Plague II-9 Pneumonic Plague II-10 Botulism II-10 Tularemia II-11 The Tularemia History II-12 Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers II-12 Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever II-12 Marburg Hemorrhagic Fever II-13 Lassa Hemorrhagic Fever II-13 Q Fever II-14 Brucellosis II-15 Ricin II-16 Others II-16 3.
These classifications are Inhalation anthrax, Cutaneous anthrax via injured skin or mucous membranes, and Gastrointestinal anthrax.
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