garret

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  • noun

Synonyms for garret

attic

Synonyms

Synonyms for garret

floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roof

References in classic literature ?
The sleeping-room of Cassy was directly under the garret.
From the day on which I first tasted blood in the garret my mind was made up; there could be no hum-dreadful-drum profession for me; literature was my game.
Anne's laugh, as blithe and irresistible as of yore, with an added note of sweetness and maturity, rang through the garret.
The story above, boasted no greater excess than a worm-eaten wash- tub; and the garret landing-place displayed no costlier articles than two crippled pitchers, and some broken blacking-bottles.
They ascended to the great garret bed- room which Arthur had occupied on the night of his return.
But inside, it was altogether charming, and the happy bride saw no fault from garret to cellar.
Vot sort of a place is dot for a woman to bear a child in-- up in a garret, mit only a ladder to it?
There was a garret above, pierced with a scuttle over his head; and down through this scuttle came a cat, suspended around the haunches by a string; she had a rag tied about her head and jaws to keep her from mewing; as she slowly descended she curved upward and clawed at the string, she swung downward and clawed at the intangible air.
We were both of us nodding ere any one invaded our retreat, and then it was Joseph, shuffling down a wooden ladder that vanished in the roof, through a trap: the ascent to his garret, I suppose.
There was yet an upper staircase, of a steeper inclination and of contracted dimensions, to be ascended, before the garret story was reached.
The garret windows and tops of houses were so crowded with spectators, that I thought in all my travels I had not seen a more populous place.
They finished their supper, the cloth was removed, and while the hostess, her daughter, and Maritornes were getting Don Quixote of La Mancha's garret ready, in which it was arranged that the women were to be quartered by themselves for the night, Don Fernando begged the captive to tell them the story of his life, for it could not fail to be strange and interesting, to judge by the hints he had let fall on his arrival in company with Zoraida.
He begun its inspection without delay, scouring it from cellar to garret.
To-morrow morning I will begin with the garret, nor desist till I have torn the house down
He therefore ordered it to be put away in the garret.