fugitive


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
  • all
  • noun
  • adj

Synonyms for fugitive

Synonyms for fugitive

fleeing or having fled, as from home, confinement, captivity, or justice

one who flees, as from home, confinement, captivity, or justice

Synonyms for fugitive

someone who flees from an uncongenial situation

someone who is sought by law officers

lasting for a markedly brief time

References in classic literature ?
Shall fugitives from labor be surrendered by national or State authority?
The prince procured for Marie Michon the dress of a cavalier and for Kitty that of a lackey; he sent them two excellent horses, and the fugitives went out hastily from Tours, shaping their course toward Spain, trembling at the least noise, following unfrequented roads, and asking for hospitality when they found themselves where there was no inn.
If I should follow the two fugitives to the end of their journey?
The fugitive had been snatched from them on the wing, and the Victoria was rapidly speeding far beyond their reach.
She thought it wisest to make her way as best she could out of the forest, and then to pursue the fugitives once more and accomplish their destruction either by force or cunning.
Three or four soldiers stood on the lawn of the inn, staring and jesting at the fugitives, without offering to help.
They re-entered, but had scarcely proceeded a hundred steps in the darkness, when a noise like the hoarse sigh of a creature in distress resounded through the cavern, and breathless, rapid, terrified, a fox passed like a flash of lightning before the fugitives, leaped over the boat and disappeared, leaving behind its sour scent, which was perceptible for several seconds under the low vaults of the cave.
The three chiefs with a dozen warriors had had no difficulty in following the tracks of the fugitives through the dust of the corridors and chambers they had traversed.
The returning hunters had covered a little more than three miles of the five that had separated them from the village when they met the first of the fugitives who had escaped the bullets and clutches of the foe.
Inside the next mile a hundred more fugitives were met.
But a moment before one of the fugitives had related to Waziri the story of the atrocious murder of the old chief's wife, and so crazed with rage was the old man that he cast discretion to the winds.
A long rifle would have thrown a bullet from the height, on which the squatter now stood, into the very cover where the fugitives, who had wrought all this mischief, were clustered.
To most of the fugitives their situation was as entirely unknown as is that of a ship in the middle of the ocean to the uninstructed voyager: but the old man proceeded at every turn, and through every bottom, with a decision that inspired his followers with confidence, as it spoke favourably of his own knowledge of the localities.
The magnificent spectacle cheered the hearts of the three fugitives and gave them fresh energy.
The ground was all stamped down by the feet of horses, showing that a large party of mounted men had overtaken the fugitives, and the direction of their tracks proved that they had afterwards turned back to Salt Lake City.