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  • noun

Synonyms for fuhrer

an absolute ruler, especially one who is harsh and oppressive

References in periodicals archive ?
When I worked as a volunteer at a charity for stammerers, one of our number was an unabashed admirer of Hitler, even though the Fuehrer was on record as labelling Britain's stammering King George as "a simpleton".
The idea was to overcome the bad spirits of the past, and to neutralise the historic contamination at the place where the Fuehrer operated his second command centre outside Berlin during the Second World War.
The production of 9/11-related comedies, for instance, mirrors the emergence of comedies about the Nazi regime in the German film industry, such as Mein Fuehrer (2007).
The other was the acceptance of the fuehrer concept in German society long before the advent of Hitler.
1934: A plebiscite in Germany gave sole power to the Fuehrer, Adolf Hitler.
Then, Cavalli continues, when Cardinal Pacelli was elected Pope on March 2, 1939, "[o]n March 4, Joseph Goebbels, the German propaganda minister, wrote in his diary: 'Midday with the Fuehrer.
Thecarwaspartofafleet used by the Fuehrer in his travels across Europe during W W2.
When der fuehrer says we is de master race We heil heil right in der fuehrer's face Not to love der fuehrer is a great disgrace So we heil heil right in der fuehrer's face.
Lieberman is no Israeli Fuehrer, because he is nothing but a cheat and a cynic.
So it is no surprise that the Beijing Games resemble the hubristic Games that beguiled the Fuehrer and enthralled the German masses in 1936.
Many books of this nature, like I Flew for the Fuehrer by Heinz Knoke, one of my favorite wartime accounts, tend to be somewhat heavy handed in an attempt to lead the reader in a certain direction or espouse a certain political point of view.
Social support can create a buffer between stress and graduate students (Bolt, 2004, Jenkins & Elliot, 2004; Jung, 1997; Lawson & Fuehrer, 1989; Mallinckrodt & Leong, 1992), particularly for students already under intense stress (Jenkins & Elliot, 2004; Mallinckrodt & Leong, 1992).
Today, Hitler's model Jew is a little-known character in Holocaust history, yet at the time neither Bloch nor his relationship to the rising Fuehrer was a great secret.
Indeed, the profile of the German Fuehrer borrows heavily from Lukacs's earlier and (at the time) very controversial book, The Hitler of History (1997).
In his most experimental work, Snodgrass leaves the sunny backyard for the grim shadows of The Fuehrer Bunker (1977, 1995), a cycle of dramatic monologues voiced and formatted to recreate the thoughts and personalities of Hitler, Eva Braun, Goebbels, Himmler, Speer, and other Nazi elite before the fall of Berlin.