fox squirrel


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Related to fox squirrel: black squirrel
  • noun

Synonyms for fox squirrel

exceptionally large arboreal squirrel of eastern United States

References in periodicals archive ?
Survival and cause-specific mortality of adult fox squirrels in southwestern Georgia.
By the time the fox squirrel was protected by federal law in 1967, it was found in only a handful of counties in Maryland--just 10 percent of its historic range.
While a strutting turkey or a 160-inch buck might get your heart beating more than a fox squirrel, the camaraderie and the time surrounding the moment are not that different.
Overall, we found the eastern gray squirrel, raccoon, and white-tailed deer to be among the most common species at the site; eastern fox squirrel, North American river otter, and American mink were among the least common.
The prairie vole, woodland vole (Microtus pinetorum), and fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) did not contain any cicada remains in their stomachs.
For an hour there was nothing to see but the chubby fox squirrel that kept climbing the tree to check out its invader eye-to-eye, so close I was sure it would jump on my shoulder, and the passing of snow geese yelling stridently to each other while riding a high tailwind to rice fields in Texas.
The Delmarva fox squirrel is one of the largest tree squirrels in the Western Hemisphere, achieving a body mass of 0.
This effectively eliminated gray and fox squirrel use while providing access to flying squirrels.
In addition to the bird species for which it is being recognized, Cool Springs is also home to other plant and animal species of importance to North Carolina like the longleaf pine, the Atlantic white cedar, the eastern black bear and the fox squirrel.
We provide geographic range for the eastern fox squirrel (Sciurus niger) and the eastern gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) in California with location points at this time of approximately 4700 for S.
Open Land or Woodland Margins - American kestrel box, 24x10x12, $20; gray and fox squirrel box, 22x12x13, $31; bluebird, chickadee or wren box (completed) or kit (unassembled), 14x6x8, $9; northern flicker box, 32x8x12, $40; bat box, 36x25x10, $95; or winter roosting box (can be used by chickadees, wrens, nuthatches, titmice, woodpeckers or bluebirds), 30x10x12, $30.