forsake

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  • verb

Synonyms for forsake

Synonyms for forsake

to give up or leave without intending to return or claim again

Synonyms for forsake

leave someone who needs or counts on you

References in classic literature ?
Sure as the morning came, it found him lingering near the house to ask if she were well; and, morning, noon, or night, go where she would, he would forsake his playmates and his sports to bear her company.
14 /PRNewswire/ -- In her new autobiography, "God Never Forsakes Me" (published by iUniverse), debut author Amelia Gong reveals the hardships she has endured and the triumphs she has seen as a result of her adoption by a loving Chinese family and the future Christian path she would eventually take because of the terrible atrocities she witnessed as a young girl.
Dracula is a vampire, and when he gets to England he visits Lucy Westenra, who forsakes her three mortal suitors to become undead.
And yes, he forsakes condoms with other HIV-positive men, and he argues that it's an incentive to keep the firewall between positives and negatives in place.
History in the interest of self-esteem (think of the Afrocentric "our people were kings" tendency) inevitably forsakes rigor.
The poet meditates divinity within these poems as a condition of being caught between a material world that forsakes the individual and a spiritual world that beautifies even breath "on the loose clouds of winter blowing through rags / stuffed between a broken window and its screen.
But on his long-awaited all-Spanish salsa effort, ``Libre'' (``Free''), the 32-year-old singer-actor forsakes a repeat performance - at least until the beginning of the year when the sequel comes to his eponymous 1999 English-language debut.
Competently performed, the dancers' rendition forsakes the subtlety and fragility of Mr.
Centering around the treacherous Dorian Gray, a young man of matchless beauty and bottomless vanity who forsakes his soul to never age, Wilde's book became viewed as both a product and a critique of gay male narcissism.
Virginia debutante Melinda Kregg first forsakes the privileges of her upper middle-class family to work for the Red Cross in the coal fields of Harlan County, Ky.
The face of you, my substitute for love," she sings in the mood-setting opening track, a love song about celebrity in which the narrator forsakes the object of her affection, wising up to the fact that fame will neither give her life meaning nor conjure up that knight in shining armor she's been questing all these years.