forsake

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  • verb

Synonyms for forsake

Synonyms for forsake

to give up or leave without intending to return or claim again

Synonyms for forsake

leave someone who needs or counts on you

References in periodicals archive ?
The answer seems to hinge on the question of whether it is possible for Christ to lose the beatific vision in dryness and forsakenness.
Yet it is when we come to the wastelands--when sorrow and dismay and fury stir us to grope for the silent God, the hidden God, the deus absconditus--and when we are lost in the roiling darkness that we demand to see God's face and find ourselves in the grip of the God who is also crying no to evil and forsakenness.
In the midst of her utter forsakenness, however, following his declaration that he is going to marry Mirah, Gwendolen notices him.
It is only when they come into contact with French civilization, Lalla by traveling to and living in France, the nomads by engaging in battle with the French soldiers, that they encounter qualities such as abandonment, desolation, forsakenness, waste.
In his portrait of Jesus, Mark emphasizes both Jesus' sonship and his forsakenness.
Sophrony develops the notion of divine forsakenness (chap.
Instead, through the life of Christ that ends on the cross, "God seeks out the lost beings he has created, and enters into their forsakenness, bringing them his fellowship, which can never be lost.
41) This orientation toward the Father involves his being forsaken by him on the Cross, and this forsakenness is for Balthasar, the very means whereby Christ recapitulates the sinner's mode of alienation from God, that whereby he represents us, takes our place.
Christ's suffering and death is a model because it provides us with an exemplary martyrdom; it is a sacrament insofar it represents our spiritual sickness and forsakenness as well as the overcoming of these through repentance and a life of discipleship.
Still, absent of any hint of revelation, Barth is able to follow the Baptist's prodigious finger to a promise of eternal life, or again, in the forsakenness of the one who announces God's alien work he hears the "irrefutably compelling" summons to a saving desperation, to a humility, and fear of God.
We believe it to be the place of salvation, of healing and deliverance, when the evidences of our time point to the cross of our forsakenness.