formication


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  • noun

Words related to formication

hallucinated sensation that insects or snakes are crawling over the skin

References in periodicals archive ?
A person with rabies had to have the following features: a history of being bitten or scratched by a dog, cat, or a wild animal, or had a wound that was licked by these animals; and clinical manifestations of itching, pain, numbness, and formication around the healed wound, followed by hyperactivity, hydrophobia, aerophobia, spasms of the pharyngeal muscle, and sympathetic excitability.
Formication is a tactile hallucination described as "something creeping on or under the skin".
An additional discussion point is methamphetamine-induced formication, the false sensation that bugs are crawling on the skin causing users to repeatedly scratch themselves to attempt to alleviate this sensation which results in some of the facial ulcerations seen in the pictures.
Garrington's study of the tactile also considers turn-of-the-century understandings of mental illness, particularly schizophrenia, which often manifests in "cutaneous hallucinations such as formication or crawling skin" (25).
There may be burning heat in the skin with formication.
The onset of menopause is associated with many symptoms whichvary among women, but generally include one or more of the following: hot flushes, numbness, tingling, insomnia, nervousness, depression, vertigo, fatigue, arthralgia, myalgia, headaches, palpitations and formication.
The Kupperman index is a numerical conversion index and covers 11 menopausal symptoms: hot flashes (vasomotor), paresthesia, insomnia, nervousness, melancholia, vertigo, weakness, arthralgia or myalgia, headache, palpitations, and formication.
Prolonged use can cause irritability and forms of psychosis, including formication, which results in users having numerous scabs from picking at imaginary insects crawling in and under their skin (Buxton & Dove, 2008).