flounder

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Synonyms for flounder

falter

Synonyms

dither

Synonyms

Synonyms for flounder

to proceed or perform in an unsteady, faltering manner

to move about in an indolent or clumsy manner

Synonyms

Synonyms for flounder

flesh of any of various American and European flatfish

any of various European and non-European marine flatfish

Related Words

walk with great difficulty

Synonyms

Related Words

behave awkwardly

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References in periodicals archive ?
Although most flounder are caught on jigs, it's hard to beat live bait.
There are some nice flounder in the Tyne - Tommy Tate took the longest at 40cm in the "One that got away", won by Gareth Gardiner with 12 fish for 311cm.
The United States had also orchestrated the bombing of Syria by parties uninvited by the Syrian government, including Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Israel, Germany, France and the United Kingdom, Flounders pointed out.
Mr Pownall finished his questions by asking Miss Flounders if she saw any future in "the relationship that you had".
Miss Flounders was handed a tissue by the court clerk and she dabbed away tears after she was asked about "other women".
Allan Maskray, from Penygraig, caught three flounders to come second with 79cm and Cardiff member Andy Kinder was third with one flounder that measured 36cm.
The Kamchatka Flounder was originally described by Jordan and Starks (1904) from a single specimen collected in Matsushima Bay, off northern Japan.
Runner-up was Derek Bibby (Crosby) with six flounders for 3480 grammes and Phil Copland (Tranmere) totalled 2800 grammes.
Another distinguishing characteristic is that the eyes of the halibut, unlike those of flounders and soles, are on both sides of the head.
Tokyo, Japan, Jan 16, 2006 - (JCN) - The Fisheries Research Agency (FRA) has developed a method of tracing released flounders using a DNA labeling technique.
Flounders inherited the Culmington estate in Shropshire from his uncle Gideon Bickerdike, who had intended leaving it to endow the Quaker Ackworth School near Pontefract, but changed his mind and left it to Benjamin Flounders with pounds 200,000 in 1807.
Flounders donated 3,000 volumes to the Green Library at Stanford University.
A person who flounders is struggling or flailing clumsily.