fleshiness


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Synonyms for fleshiness

References in periodicals archive ?
The triune community is a community of difference, and fleshiness belongs to the Son proper.
NICHOLAS PENNY: One of the things that has most struck me in the exhibition [15 September--9 December] has been what you might call the fleshiness of a lot of bronze sculpture, and how successful--almost disturbingly successful sometimes--bronze can be at conveying this quality.
You've got the bittersweet broad beans, the salty spice of the chorizo and the succulent sweetness and fleshiness of the scallop.
Some of the gene copies changed over time, giving rise to the redness and fleshiness prized in tomatoes today.
She hated the exposed fleshiness of them, their soft brown bodies and soft bashful faces that were also insolent and inquisitive, and their chattering voices that held a brazen fleshy undertone.
The fleshiness of his nudes suggests that like Haydon and recalling Hogarth, Wilkie was part of a reaction, encouraged for example by Charles Bell, that favored naturalistic representations to idealized figures: see Ilana Bignamini, "The Artist's Model from Lely to Hogarth"; and Martin Postle, "The Artist's Model from Reynolds to Etty"; both in Bignamini and Postle, The Artist's Model: Its Role in British An from Lely to Etty (Nottingham: University Art Gallery 1991) 14-15, 20-21, 23, 51-52, 73-74.
Diagnostic features observable in the field, such as stature, color, fleshiness and luster, are rarely noted by collectors on museum labels.
Its texture is complimented by pearliness of pears and the fleshiness of stewed white grapes and slices of apple.
the size of the hips, fleshiness of the body or slenderness of the waist, or the nature of erotic curves etc.
Instead, she proposes we inhabit a 'trans-corporeality'--'the time-space where human corporeality, in all its material fleshiness, is inseparable from "nature" or "environment" ' (238).