fleet


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Related to fleet: Fleet Laxative
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  • noun
  • adj
  • verb

Synonyms for fleet

Synonyms for fleet

Synonyms for fleet

group of aircraft operating together under the same ownership

a group of steamships operating together under the same ownership

move along rapidly and lightly

disappear gradually

moving very fast

Synonyms

Related Words

References in classic literature ?
And now Iris, fleet as the wind, was sent by Jove to tell the bad news among the Trojans.
Chromis, and Ennomus the augur, led the Mysians, but his skill in augury availed not to save him from destruction, for he fell by the hand of the fleet descendant of Aeacus in the river, where he slew others also of the Trojans.
He came into the fight with gold about him, like a girl; fool that he was, his gold was of no avail to save him, for he fell in the river by the hand of the fleet descendant of Aeacus, and Achilles bore away his gold.
All that night the Virgin roared hoarsely and next morning, over an angry, white-headed sea, Harvey saw the Fleet with flickering masts waiting for a lead.
There was a general sorting out among the Fleet next day; and though no one said anything, all ate with better appetites when boat after boat reported full crews aboard.
Why, they sunk him six mile to south'ard o' the Fleet, an' we're two miles from where she's lyin' now.
The fleet in the darkness of the preceding night had barely grazed the crest of the hills, and in the brief span that they hovered close to the surface the black guard had pitched me, as he supposed, to my death.
In the matter of equipping a fleet to enter Omean the details were left to Kantos Kan and Xodar.
He craned his neck, but he could not see if the rest of the fleet was following them; the overhang of the gas-chambers intervened.
There was no alternative to her abandonment but a fleet engagement.
In my day I commanded the fleets of Lothar--mightiest of all the fleets that sailed the five salt seas.
Hooja's fleet had been in much more compact forma-tion when we sighted them this time than on the occasion following the tempest.
The oyster pirates, a fleet of a dozen sloops, were lying at anchor on what was known as the "Deserted Beds.
With only ten feet of water under us, this would permit the Coal Tar Maggie to swing in a circle six hundred feet in diameter, in which circle she would be able to foul at least half the fleet.
The attempts of the immense fleets of junks were pitiful.