figurative

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  • adj

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Synonyms for figurative

(used of the meanings of words or text) not literal

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consisting of or forming human or animal figures

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References in periodicals archive ?
The second point of interest is the fundamental difference between figurativeness and polysemy.
His way of approaching the historical events whose representation he undertakes, not only displays the fundamental figurativeness of his actions; it also shows that this figurativeness ultimately operates as the means to restore interpersonal understanding between the naively disturbed protagonist and his both psychologically and materially devastated surroundings.
Searching for better criteria to distinguish humour from figurativeness and funniness from seriousness, it might perhaps be good to look back to former theories of superiority/disparagement and relaxation/relief that have been declared tacitly and utterly obsolete, often for outside reasons like political correctness and related forms of social hypocrisy.
13) Although all common types of metalepsis (for a systematic treatment, see Fludernik "Metalepsis") occur in Heine's Ideen, it would of course be problematic to claim that the figurativeness itself constitutes a narrative "level" that trespasses onto another one, all the more because the scenic potential of the travelogue as coherent "storyworld" is radically bracketed by the overtness of the discourse throughout.
This claim rests on our assumption that the network of creative, marked figurativeness gives rise to a kind of second order action, an "observation of observation" as defined by Luhmann.
The aestheticization of fictionality or figurativeness never quite exorcises a more radical figurativeness: a figurativeness at work in aesthetic phenomenality, yet inaccessible to phenomenalization.
What engages one right off is the quality of the language of Komunyakaa's poetry, a freshness marked by a delightful figurativeness and a wit that never cloys and which may be attributed in great part to the richness of the material from which it springs.
Corngold thus modifies the paradoxical figurativeness of metamorphosis that Anders and Sokel locate in Kafka and defines the tropological aspect of metamorphosis further toward a metonymical process.