festering


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Synonyms for festering

Synonyms for festering

(medicine) the formation of morbific matter in an abscess or a vesicle and the discharge of pus

References in periodicals archive ?
An infected cut on her left foot had turned into a persistent, festering wound.
Still, Silverman's words and her tale beckon, an immersion we all need if we, as society, are ever to begin cleansing this festering, hidden wound that surrounds us in silent horror.
In this book, the writer explores three particularly unsavory conflicts festering in out-of-the-way places: endemic violence in Sierra Leone; the unending bloodletting in Chechnya; and a little Pacific horror called Bougainville.
Telling their stones did mean you were running the risk of opening wounds, but in fact often they were wounds that had been festering and to open them now in this fashion had the chance of cleansing them and pouring a balm, an ointment on them," he said.
There are places worth revisiting not to relive joyful memories, but to allow for the catharsis that comes from exposing festering wounds so that cleansing, and perhaps healing, can begin.
Desperately seeking to defuse a festering inter-religious controversy, Republican leaders in the House of Representatives made a surprise appointment in late March and named a Roman Catholic priest as House chaplain.
Dissatisfaction in the carrier ranks had been festering for years, says Patrick's father Henry Shelton, a local community organizer.
Antoine's festering resentments toward Helene explode into road rage, along with insipid declarations that he wants to ``live like a man'' and ``be free.
It is a festering sore and until it is resolved I don't think the Labour Party is going to be as united as we all want "
Ten years later, the ensuing neglect of the issue may be festering to a point where it again becomes a key election issue.
She writes to help in the healing of the many wounds still festering because of this war, and she emphasizes the stories of individuals who have found some peace even after their traumas.
The passing on of abuse is deeply self-destructive, because it invariably reduces security, provokes reciprocal rage and creates festering civil strife and intrastate genocide.