femme fatale

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  • noun

Synonyms for femme fatale

Synonyms for femme fatale

a usually unscrupulous woman who seduces or exploits men

Synonyms for femme fatale

a woman who is considered to be dangerously seductive

References in periodicals archive ?
The power of the femme fatale is such that she takes on apparently male attributes: Gautier's Mademoiselle de Maupin dresses as a swordsman, and women from history who assumed traditionally male positions of authority were frequently represented as femmes fatales.
Some see an interest in the femme fatale as an expression of modernism; for example, Daniel Singal argues that femmes fatales are introduced into Flags in the Dust to disrupt Horace Benbow's "Victorian sensibility" (106) by leading him to commit acts that he would otherwise find unthinkable, and concludes that their presence ensures that "Horace's story amounts to an impassioned assault on nineteenth-century southern culture" (109).
Rather than ground my discussion of the changes in Faulkner's femmes fatales in a biographical narrative of artistic maturation, I wish to highlight the extent to which the figure's meaning was in flux as Faulkner was drawing upon it.
Gorman's "Lilith, Lilith" (45), femmes fatales literally appear one after another.
16) The fact that the text contains two almost interchangeable femmes fatales suggests that the figure is a harrowing but somewhat ephemeral instrument of social critique that strains to do the work with which it is tasked.
21) If, in Flags in the Dust, characters described as femmes fatales are invested with power and socially explosive sexuality, Shreve's use of the figure allows him to insult Mrs.
Femmes fatales can be blonde prostitutes, singers, aristocrats, secretaries, housemaids, failed actresses or even orange sellers.
The couple killed themselves the day after they were married, so maybe there's a moral in the story for other femmes fatales.
To identify with this passage is, on the one hand, to reproduce the identification structure infilm noir with bad guys, femmes fatales, and neurotic detectives.
Casting is under way for the independent feature, ``Death Row Dolls'' - shades of '50s B-grade drive-in fare - and includes such femmes fatales as a woman who burned down a modeling agency, another who broke a man's neck while fist-fighting in a parking lot and an ``angry blonde'' who committed parricide.
In this show the only indisputably exotic Asian femmes fatales are drag queens.
Forget ``Double Indemnity'' and all those films noir featuring greedy femmes fatales and villains who commit murder for that insurance pot.
She writes that those '60s femmes fatales, Jeanne Moreau and Brigitte Bardot, heralded ``a new era, a new kind of woman who rejected bourgeois conventions and went after what she wanted.
As glorious monsters, Muses, femmes fatales, worker bees, queen bees and sweet and sour dames, movies are full of women in convention-stretching roles that contravene a simple dialectic in which the active male gaze transfixes and objectifies the supposedly passive female.