farthingale

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  • noun

Words related to farthingale

a hoop worn beneath a skirt to extend it horizontally

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References in periodicals archive ?
Among the everyday elite payments in LR 6/154/9--for farthingales, silk stockings, and servants" wages--there is a particular set of costs incurred in making and performing the masque The Vision of the Twelve Goddesses.
Corsets constrict women's torsos, and long dresses over bell-shaped farthingales or bum rolls and petticoats hide and inhibit the legs.
I was in huge farthingales, huge fan ruffs and all sorts.
De Beauvoir argued that female costumes and styles have been designed to prevent activity: "Chinese women with bound feet could scarcely walk, the polished fingernails of the Hollywood star deprive her of her hands; high heels, corsets, panniers, farthingales, crinolines were intended less to accentuate the curves of the feminine body than to augment its incapacity".
And revel it as bravely as the best, With silken coats and caps, and golden rings, With ruffs and cuffs and farthingales and things, With scarves and fans and double change of brav'ry, With amber bracelets, beads and all this knav'ry.
In this piece, the most interesting in the book, we learn about chopines and farthingales, the ridiculously high platform shoes and the wide hooped skirts which became very fashionable even while they were preached against.
This is a modern-day production, no doublet and hose, no farthingales, and for some reason which I would like explained to me, it seems to be happening in 1981.
When upper class Elizabethans dressed their little girls in farthingales or the Victorians in crinolines, they were copying not only adult fashion but fashion which enhanced a specifically female aspect of physiology, - the waist/hip curve.
How nice it would have been to have been taken back to the Elizabethan world of ruffs and farthingales for once, thus making sense of lines which refer to these and other period things.
In the end, the Farthingales said that Mr Wallace had told them that he was authorised to conduct investment business.
After going into all the evidence in detail, the scheme eventually accepted that the Farthingales had no reason to doubt that they had been dealing with an authorised firm and that their pounds 20,000 counted as an investment for the purposes of the scheme.
Both he and his lady wore elaborate and voluminous costumes; she wore a farthingale and puffed sleeves and a ruff, and he wore a slashed doublet and cape, and a sword at his side.