fanny


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  • noun

Synonyms for fanny

the part of one's back on which one rests in sitting

Synonyms for fanny

References in classic literature ?
And I told you, Mrs Merdle,' said Fanny, 'that we might be unfortunate, but we are not common.
And I told you, Mrs Merdle,' said Fanny, 'that if you spoke to me of the superiority of your son's standing in Society, it was barely possible that you rather deceived yourself in your suppositions about my origin; and that my father's standing, even in the Society in which he now moved (what that was, was best known to myself), was eminently superior, and was acknowledged by every one.
Let my sister know, if you please, Mrs Merdle,' Fanny pouted, with a toss of her gauzy bonnet, 'that I had already had the honour of telling your son that I wished to have nothing whatever to say to him.
Little Dorrit looked sorry, and glanced at Fanny with a troubled face.
said Fanny, when they had gone a little way without speaking.
I am so sorry--don't be hurt--but, since you ask me what I have to say, I am so very sorry, Fanny, that you suffered this lady to give you anything.
They spoke no more all the way back to the lodging where Fanny and her uncle lived.
He could not but wonder at her refusing to do anything for a niece whom she had been so forward to adopt; but, as she took early care to make him, as well as Lady Bertram, understand that whatever she possessed was designed for their family, he soon grew reconciled to a distinction which, at the same time that it was advantageous and complimentary to them, would enable him better to provide for Fanny himself.
and would he only have smiled upon her, and called her "my dear Fanny," while he said it, every former frown or cold address might have been forgotten.
Polly's eye went from one little figure to the other, and she thought that Fanny looked the oddest of the two; for Polly lived in a quiet country town, and knew very little of city fashions.
Before Fanny could answer, a scream from below made both listen.
Come down and have dinner; that will amuse you;" and Fanny got up, pluming herself as a bird does before its flight.
Before she could continue, in came Fanny with the joyful news that Clara Bird had invited them both to go to the theatre with her that very evening, and would call for them at seven o'clock.
She did not know how easy it was to "get used to it," as Fanny did; and it was well for her that the temptation was not often offered.
As Polly freed her mind, and emphasized her opinion with a decided rap of the boot she had just taken off, Fanny laughed, and said, while she pirouetted about the room, like Mademoiselle Therese, "Polly was shocked, grandma.