fame


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  • noun

Synonyms for fame

Synonyms for fame

Synonyms for fame

the state or quality of being widely honored and acclaimed

favorable public reputation

Related Words

Antonyms

References in classic literature ?
The king will then command all those present to essay it, and none will bring it to an end and conclusion save the stranger knight, to the great enhancement of his fame, whereat the princess will be overjoyed and will esteem herself happy and fortunate in having fixed and placed her thoughts so high.
The fame of this wall will reach as far as dawn itself, and men will no longer think anything of the one which Phoebus Apollo and myself built with so much labour for Laomedon.
Not all our power is gone - not all our fame - "Not all the magic of our high renown - "Not all the wonder that encircles us - "Not all the mysteries that in us lie - "Not all the memories that hang upon "And cling around about us as a garment, "Clothing us in a robe of more than glory.
Death hath this also; that it openeth the gate to good fame, and extinguisheth envy.
It was the period in Germany of Goethe's highest fame.
The only fame of my poem which reached me was when another boy in the office quoted some lines of it in derision.
it is all that saved him from exploding--and my dreams of an Honorary Fellowship, gold medals, and a niche in the Hall of Fame faded into the thin, cold air of his arctic atmosphere.
The mother left with her son, and a month later the boy recovered, and the fame of the holy healing power of the starets Sergius (as they now called him) spread throughout the whole district.
While other towns boast of the magnificence of their arsenals and dock-yards, and the splendour of their shops and markets, Haarlem's claims to fame rest upon her superiority to all other provincial cities in the number and beauty of her spreading elms, graceful poplars, and, more than all, upon her pleasant walks, shaded by the lovely arches of magnificent oaks, lindens, and chestnuts.
He had discovered that he loved beauty more than fame, and that what desire he had for fame was largely for Ruth's sake.
Affecting private life, or more obscure In savage wilderness, wherefore deprive All Earth her wonder at thy acts, thyself The fame and glory--glory, the reward That sole excites to high attempts the flame Of most erected spirits, most tempered pure AEthereal, who all pleasures else despise, All treasures and all gain esteem as dross, And dignities and powers, all but the highest?
The fame and brilliancy of the prince's court had drawn the knights-errant and pursuivants-of-arms from every part of Europe.
Doe after the good and leave the ill, and it shall bring you unto good fame and renowne.
The talented Vincent Crummles, long favourably known to fame as a country manager and actor of no ordinary pretensions, is about to cross the Atlantic on a histrionic expedition.
Away from the market-place and from fame taketh place all that is great: away from the market-Place and from fame have ever dwelt the devisers of new values.