falciform

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Related to falx: Falx inguinalis
  • adj

Synonyms for falciform

curved like a sickle

References in periodicals archive ?
Thereafter, the falx is inspected and removed, followed by the left cerebral hemisphere, such that the whole tentorium is now exposed and can be inspected while intact for tears and hemorrhages.
A number of industry participants are referenced within the electric aircraft report, including: Alatus, Diamond Aircraft, Electravia, Falx, Lange Aviation, Lite Machines Corporation, Renault, Sikorsky, Sunrise, Tokyo University, Windward Performance and Yuneec International.
The anatomical landmarks used to ensure the accuracy and reproducibility of the measurement include a midline falx, thalami symmetrically positioned on either side of the flax and visualization of the Septum Pellucidum at one third the frontooccipital distance.
Transventricular: skull, midline, falx, cavus septi pellucidi, lateral ventricles, head circumference, ventricular atrium
Isolated meningeal chloroma (granulocytic sarcoma) in a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia mimicking a falx meningioma.
Factors that could contribute to an anterior susceptibility to strain forces in humans include the relatively large mass of the human frontal lobes and the fact that the anterior human brain is less constrained in its movement inside the skull than is the posterior brain, which is embraced by the falx and the tentorium.
8) Subdural hemorrhage is bounded by the midline falx and is due to tearing of bridging cortical veins (Figure 6).
However, the diagnosis of 1 case of meningioma in our study was confirmed by conventional MR sequences, depending on the presence of a dural tail and the relation of the tumour to the adjacent falx (patient no.
Both tumors were adherent to the underlying brain parenchyma as well as to the falx cerebri.
If intracranial extension is present, it classically occurs through the foramen cecum or cribiform plate and attaches extradurally to the falx cerebri.
Roman-period agricultural tool assemblages from the continent have often included a specific hand-held tool, the falx vinitoria, incorporating a blade, a paring-edge, a pointed projection for gouging and hollowing bark and a tiny axe-blade attached to the back of the blade (Ferdiere 1988).