fallen

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  • adj

Synonyms for fallen

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having dropped by the force of gravity

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having fallen in or collapsed

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having lost your chastity

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killed in battle

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References in periodicals archive ?
Scott Smith, "Finitude, Fallenness, and Immediacy: Husserlian Replies to Westphal and Smith," Philosophia Christi 13, no.
35) In the last of these supplementary manuscripts, we finally encounter a surprising, but perplexing distinction between [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]: while [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is derivative and an instance of fallenness, "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] on the contrary has passed through the stay (Aufenthalt): the radicalization of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], a way of 'concern' (Besorgen) that originates from [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] and constitutes primordially so much the 'practical' as well as the 'theoretical.
We sense the fallenness of nature in Lady Macbeth's counsel to her husband: "look like th'innocent flower, / But be the serpent under't" (1.
From a theological perspective, the concept of fallenness seems to provide an important insight.
This is reflected not only in implications of fallenness when they criticize those among themselves who have capitulated to Port Moresby's profane temptations, but also in debates about the commercialization of the Hiri Moale, which is held to symbolize a culture which is exclusive and 'sacred'.
Allegory, that is, manifests a fallenness, or more accurately, a rhetorical falling that never ends.
Tainted Souls and Painted Faces: The Rhetoric of Fallenness in Victorian Culture.
Disambiguating" the sublime becomes tantamount to making it definitive of the human condition: "the sublime emerges when the fallen reclaim language and struggle to articulate, or indeed explain, the unknowable state of their fallenness.
Political imperative and socio-cultural bearings combined to create the myth of Anglo-Indian fallenness.
Corrective treatment, Picasso, and constructive play, which glare in the manuscript as items of Waugh's particular disgust, are, in the detached published text, simply products of a secular humanist society that has systematically stripped itself of the knowledge of humankind's intrinsic fallenness.
Perhaps the most painful tension exemplified by Fithian involves the uneasy relationship between his Enlightenment-bred progressivism and his Presbyterian sense of human fallenness.
For Cohen, our destiny now is no different, yet we sing from a context of fallenness.
Moustakas (1994) observed that when people are dominated by public opinion and affected by the world outside, they are in a state of fallenness.
As if pondering life's general fallenness, Woolf further studies fluctuating moments (and other temporal units) in her other mid-1920s novel Mrs.
You might watch a football game one Sunday and see several dozen hits and tackles, the fallenness that stops play, without once reflecting on the violent sensory scramble that a fall creates.