fallacy

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Related to fallacies: Logical fallacies
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  • noun

Synonyms for fallacy

Synonyms for fallacy

an erroneous or false idea

plausible but invalid reasoning

Synonyms for fallacy

References in periodicals archive ?
After all, the "Authority-worshipper's argument" was another of the fallacies he rejected.
Using Thomas Sowell's Economic Facts and Fallacies, students are able to understand the background surrounding many common fallacies and the empirical facts related to each topic.
A steadily growing list with visuals of the most common thinking mistakes, fallacies, biases and effects, combined with definitions, origin, links, samples and special tips.
She pointed out that it is the right of people to receive news and information from any source and by any means and it is the right of countries to defend themselves against rumours, fallacies and disinformation.
It identifies and defines all-time favorite fallacies like "ad hominem," which is attacking your opponent's character rather than his argument, and "no true Scotsman," which in these latitudes might be better known as "love it or leave it.
Rossi need not invent new fallacies to promote his book's place within Dickian criticism.
2 is meant to be an anchor from which can be shown how each of the five fallacies discussed below entices a departure from a coherent reality, where the logical sequence of events is consistent for every reference frame, into an incoherent reality where physical events differ based on reference frames from which observations are made.
Dacey argues that they are confused, having succumbed to two fallacies, the Privacy and Liberty Fallacies: 'The Privacy Fallacy consists in assuming that because matters of conscience are private in the sense of nongovernmental, they are private in the sense of personal preference .
Although these two kinds of reasoning do involve some elementary logical mistakes, it happens that in exposing these fallacies the critics sometimes introduce serious misconceptions of their own.
He presents basic concepts in reasoning and understanding fallacies and goes through many specific examples of types of fallacies, such as the fallacy of exclusion and red herring fallacy, and comments on their occurrence in medicine.
Most of the fallacies of concern underlie economic policies that have not achieved their objectives and have often led to disastrous unintended consequences.
My good friend Bob Humphrey, a wildlife biologist and outdoor writer, and I were discussing some of the major fallacies about whitetails and, more specifically, whitetail hunting.
A Failure of Nerve examines fallacies of emotional and intellectual thinking that can bedevil leaders of individual, group, and national efforts, including the fallacy of paying too much attention to raw accumulated data; the fallacy of allowing empathy for others' feelings (normally a positive quality) to corrupt logical reasoning or blind one's measured consideration of new ideas; and the importance of the expression of the self in a leader.
Marcus Winters nicely nails the empirical and conceptual fallacies in Jonathan Kozol's tiresome jihads against the alleged institutional racism causing the unequal funding of schools ("Savage Exaggerations: Worshiping the Cosmology of Jonathan Kozol," check the facts, Spring 2006).
New Testament scholar Robert Price, member of the Jesus Seminar, here examines the fallacies of Christian history and usage in THE DA VINCI CODE, drawing important connections between fantasy and real history and adding religious insights based on known facts about Jesus and his life, the Gospels, and historical figures.