exposure

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  • noun

Synonyms for exposure

Synonyms for exposure

the condition of being laid open to something undesirable or injurious

something disclosed, especially something not previously known or realized

Synonyms for exposure

vulnerability to the elements

the act of subjecting someone to an influencing experience

the disclosure of something secret

aspect resulting from the direction a building or window faces

the state of being vulnerable or exposed

Related Words

the intensity of light falling on a photographic film or plate

Related Words

the act of exposing film to light

presentation to view in an open or public manner

abandoning without shelter or protection (as by leaving as infant out in the open)

References in periodicals archive ?
By compiling empirically determined parameters related to the between-pollutant relationships and their associated exposure error (Table 1), and utilizing Equation 3, we were able to quantify the potential attenuation of model coefficients in a bipollutant model.
Figure 4 presents the potential attenuation factors for single- and bipollutant epidemiologic models, based on empirical estimates of the relations hips between exposure metrics and their exposure error.
5]) pollutant are presented in Figure 4D, showing significant differences in the attenuation factor across types of exposure error but smaller differences between single- and bipollutant models.
An improved understanding of the degree of exposure error among pollutants and their dependent structure is needed to properly interpret results from epidemiologic models that include multiple pollutants.
In a multi-pollutant model, the absolute magnitude of this bias will depend on the variance of the exposure error, the correlation between exposure estimates, and the correlation between exposure errors.
total]) variance of exposure error for regional pollutants (Figure 3A, Table 1).
We start with a personal risk model (Equation 5) and a decomposition of the exposure error (Equation 7) to obtain
Most exposure errors combine elements of each, but because the consequences on risk assessment of classical and Berkson errors differ, it is useful to consider each in turn.
In general, the effect of such exposure errors is intermediate between the two extreme models.
2t] and there is equal variability of the two exposure errors [[Delta].
Nonetheless, the linear regression with classical measurement error is a leading case that provides insight into the major possible consequences of exposure errors.