expletive

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  • noun

Synonyms for expletive

Synonyms for expletive

a profane or obscene term

Synonyms for expletive

profane or obscene expression usually of surprise or anger

a word or phrase conveying no independent meaning but added to fill out a sentence or metrical line

References in classic literature ?
He was detestably poor, and this was the reason, no doubt, that his expletive expressions about betting, seldom took a pecuniary turn.
Simpson, after having let a variety of expletive adjectives loose upon society without any substantive to accompany them, tucked up his sleeves, and began to wash the greens for dinner.
Obviously there were lots of expletives in between and that he would be losing his job.
Supreme Court gave the FCC the green light to continue imposing indecency fines on the networks for fleeting expletives and brief nudity.
The 'Braveheart' star told the talk show host that he was justified in unleashing a stream of expletives against screenwriter Joe Eszterhas.
Fox Television Stations, involving expletives used by Cher and Nicole Richie at the 2002 and 2003 Billboard Music Awards, respectively.
Therefore, I would like to challenge every adult in Liverpool to think twice before using an expletive in front of a young person and to challenge other people using expletives in everyday conversation (in a friendly way) as they are overused, dull and a very poor example for young learners
In February of 2009, Oklahoma State University's men's basketball coach Travis Ford was caught by a live television feed screaming expletives at one of his players (Associated Press, 2009).
Or is it because it's awoman who is uttering the expletives
A federal appeals court has issued a sensible ruling on the strict standards the Federal Communications Commission imposed that year to punish broadcasters who inadvertently aired nudity or expletives.
and Nicole Richie broadcasts of so-called fleeting expletives.
MOTHERWELL 1 KILMARNOCK 0 WELL manager Craig Brown credited assistant Archie Knox's expletives for their latest victory.
Just why this process involves so many expletives is unclear.
The use of expletives is OK in a fictional World War II movie because they are "integral" to the film yet indecent in a documentary about real-life blues musicians.
TV regulator, the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) ruling that punishes broadcasters for airing "fleeting expletives.