explanandum

(redirected from explananda)
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Related to explananda: explanans
  • noun

Synonyms for explanandum

(logic) a statement of something (a fact or thing or expression) to be explained

References in periodicals archive ?
Cognitive capacities, not behavior, are taken to be the proper domain for the explananda of cognitive, science.
The contemporary debate over Aristotle's conception of natural teleology centers on the philosophical issue at stake in Aristotle's supposed introduction of formal/final causation on the organic level: one side claims his reason was to explain organic phenomena his opponents tried but failed to explain via elemental material/efficient causation, and the other side claims his reason was to explain the organic phenomena his opponents failed to recognize as explananda.
Thus, commentators have disagreed about the philosophical issue at stake in Aristotle's introduction of formal/final causation on the organic level: one side claims his reason was to explain the organic phenomena his opponents tried but failed to explain via elemental material/efficient causation, and the other side claims his reason was to refute a position on which organic phenomena would fail to be explananda.
A research question must have not only an explanandum (the thing to be explained), but also one or more potential explananda (the things that do the explaining).
Rules are the explanantia in his functional economics, but the explananda of his evolutionary economics.
The foremost one of these concerns Scotus' discrimination between two explanative levels of phenomena: on the natural level, the elucidation is drawn from reduction of the explananda to a form of natural necessity, couched in a set of efficient etc.
Theoretic Identities as Explanatia and Explananda, KEVIN MORRIS
8 turns on a contrast between teleological and obviously non-teleological explananda (cf.
What is more, the explananda and explanantia in covering-law explanations are descriptions of events, etc.
Physics shows us how a different language from Newtonian physics must be introduced in order to give a more complete account for explananda.
Pragmatism, for these authors, is 'metaphysically quietist' (93, 98-101, 118); it has a 'second-order, or "linguistic" focus' (94), beginning with 'linguistic explananda rather than material explananda' (95).