expect

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Related to expects: detract from
  • verb

Synonyms for expect

Synonyms for expect

to oblige to do or not do by force of authority, propriety, or custom

Synonyms for expect

References in classic literature ?
Oh, there are a lot of such things that people expect and don't get.
I really did not expect any Grace to answer; for the laugh was as tragic, as preternatural a laugh as any I ever heard; and, but that it was high noon, and that no circumstance of ghostliness accompanied the curious cachinnation; but that neither scene nor season favoured fear, I should have been superstitiously afraid.
The herald communicated the words of the Grand Master to Rebecca, who bowed her head submissively, folded her arms, and, looking up towards heaven, seemed to expect that aid from above which she could scarce promise herself from man.
Oh, I know I am talking nonsense, Miss Wilson; but can you expect me to be always sensible--to be infallible?
With the utmost pleasure," replied the Sultan; "and as I am all impatience to see the sister of such accomplished young men you may expect me the day after to-morrow.
Now tell me, so may God deliver you from this affliction, and so may you find yourself when you least expect it in the arms of my lady Dulcinea-"
The person my uncle expects may arrive at any moment.
True, Dantes, I forgot that there was at the Catalans some one who expects you no less impatiently than your father -- the lovely Mercedes.
Yet he declares that daily he expects a favourable issue to his affair--that he has no doubt of it whatever.
Does it not expressly declare that Caroline neither expects nor wishes me to be her sister; that she is perfectly convinced of her brother's indifference; and that if she suspects the nature of my feelings for him, she means (most kindly
Has your majesty forgotten that the king expects your reply and awaits it in agony?
Reese is always so careless, and then expects other people to mend her mistakes.
No wonder, taking the whole fleet of whalemen in a body, that out of fifty fair chances for a dart, not five are successful; no wonder that so many hapless harpooneers are madly cursed and disrated; no wonder that some of them actually burst their blood-vessels in the boat; no wonder that some sperm whalemen are absent four years with four barrels; no wonder that to many ship owners, whaling is but a losing concern; for it is the harpooneer that makes the voyage, and if you take the breath out of his body how can you expect to find it there when most wanted
No one, at least, can think I have not done enough for them: even themselves, they can hardly expect more.
The future situations in which we must expect to be usually placed, do not present any equivalent security against the danger which is apprehended.