expectedness


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  • noun

Synonyms for expectedness

the state of being that is commonly observed

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ordinariness as a consequence of being expected and not surprising

References in periodicals archive ?
If the poem partakes of any of those things, depending on the reader, it courts the sentimentality of expectedness (see number 2).
The term of "frustrated waiting" is in itself a simple example of the order-disorder report: aesthetic pleasure has its source in "the human sense of gratification for the unexpected rise from expectedness, both of them unthinkable without the opposite" (Jakobson 1960: 363).
Don't get me wrong, the movie was as it is rated, for those aged 13, and completely predictable with semi-recognisable faces, but it's that expectedness and silliness that made it an enjoyable, mindless 89 minutes.
Hence, significance is a function of an event's novelty, expectedness, and consistency with the individual's assumptions and knowledge base.
These specific events are perceived by the journalists as newsworthy (Galtung and Ruge model (39)), based on their: actuality, currency, proximity, continuity, uniqueness, simplicity, expectedness, exclusivity, size, personality, negativism and elite nations or people.
Chance can mean contingency, accidents or coincidence, it can occur at the beginning or at the end of the novel, and the degree of expectedness and the consequences is also relevant, says Wolf.
The novel's tongue-in-cheek evocations of such alignments testify to, and yet simultaneously question, their pervasiveness, their expectedness even, as an essential part of the sensation novel's clinical Gothic.
Experts agree that emails and their subject lines should carry a degree of expectedness, to help dodge aggressive spam filters, with enough intrigue and curiosity left for readers to open the email.
1977) (describing "naturalness or expectedness of the bequest" as an element of the undue-influence claim and noting that "[t]he fact that the testator has excluded a natural object of his bounty is 'red flag of warning"').