expatiation


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Related to expatiation: placated
  • noun

Words related to expatiation

a discussion (spoken or written) that enlarges on a topic or theme at length or in detail

References in periodicals archive ?
Chapadeau's occupation, one highly influential with the youth of the community, coupled with the oft-cited menace of heroin addiction makes further expatiation unnecessary.
But by the same token, this self-affirmation as his brothers' sole penile provider, and his self-fulfilment effected in that moment, were nothing more than the echo of his own expatiation.
Dixon's expatiation on race within this scene marks how the sign "negro" is at once radically demonstrative (telling/testamentary) and evacuative (shares nothing/empties out meaning).
Lazare date from to 1170-89, according to records of funds donated by Henry II in expatiation for the death of Thomas Becket (Crozet 459, Joubert 12).
I have attempted to relieve this density by means of an expatiation through some of Lonergan's source texts in the context of a consideration of his evolving appreciation of mysticism.
These, together with the vivid examples he offers, give a sense of an almost armchair expatiation of information; the well-documented manuscript sources he draws from promise to be fruitful fields for research in many areas other than history.
Maisie's discomfiture and reluctance begin to melt before the Captain's expatiation of his bemused adoration of Ida.
And each new study that appears of that much maligned monarch strengthens the impression of this reviewer, that our understanding of that failure of judgement requires, above all, a better examination of the dimensions, and the unpredictable novelty, of what Charles was up against, rather than further expatiation upon his personal deficiencies.