expatiate

(redirected from expatiated)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Idioms.
Related to expatiated: expatriate, inculcated
Graphic Thesaurus  🔍
Display ON
Animation ON
Legend
Synonym
Antonym
Related
  • verb

Synonyms for expatiate

to express at greater length or in greater detail

Synonyms for expatiate

References in periodicals archive ?
Chairman CDA and Mayor of Islamabad Metropolitan Corporation Sheikh Ansar Aziz told reporters in a Meet-the-Press that the work on already launched incomplete sectors would also be expatiated.
Technology is changing the world,' pointed out Matt Minetola, chief information officer, Travelport, who expatiated how the company is heavily investing in its software development to enable clients to differentiate their brand, image, product and overall offering, with an end-to-end service on their platform.
The Italian statesman and author of The Prince, Niccolo Machiavelli, expatiated more on that law when he said: "He who desires or attempts to reform the government of a state, and wishes to have it accepted, must at least retain the semblance of the old forms; so that it may seem to the people that there has been no change in the institutions, even though in fact they are entirely different from the old ones.
Kassar expatiated on moderation "that represents the essence of humanity.
It further shows how his particular way of framing the cosmopolitan problematic can be expanded and expatiated upon to develop a more critical, reflexive, and open-ended conception of cosmopolitan thinking.
expatiated by Eduardo Eguren, Burgan Bank Chief Executive Officer.
Torquay does have a lot in its favour which does not need to be emphasised or expatiated upon, as I am aware from a number of past visits (either by coach excursion or independently) over at least the past decade or two.
In a statement issued today the AMI said the two expatiated staff members were abducted at the compound of the group in Ed El-Fursan, on the night of 4 to 5 April.
Christine Ebersole, the actress who won a Tony for portraying both Big and Little Edie in the stage musical, expatiated on the gay-as-outsider theme during a TV interview to promote the show, venturing to suggest that more and more Americans--and not just gay and lesbian ones--could relate to the Edies as the Bush years came to a close, precisely because so many people were now feeling like beleaguered outsiders who were no longer part of "mainstream" America after eight years of Republican rule.