Eustachian tube

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Related to eustachian: Eustachian valve, eustachian salpingitis
  • noun

Synonyms for Eustachian tube

either of the paired tubes connecting the middle ears to the nasopharynx

References in periodicals archive ?
Some GPs will recommend either oral or nasal decongestants to help resolve the problem if it's ongoing - these work by helping to open the eustachian tube.
Anatomical development of the Eustachian tube depends on cranio-facial growth and body development [Di Francesco et al.
Physicians and patients worldwide face many challenges in treating Eustachian Tube Dysfunction," said Dennis S.
Acute inferior cardiac inflow obstruction resulting from inadvertent surgical closure of a prominent Eustachian valve mistaken for an atrial septal defect.
The VT has another very beneficial function in that it serves as a portal for topical delivery of medications to the middle-ear space, and subsequently via the eustachian tube to the nasopharynx.
This problem is fixed by the eustachian tube, which connects the middle ear to the throat.
The primary cause of recurrent middle ear infections is thought to be a dysfunction in the Eustachian tube, a narrow tube that extends from the middle ear to the nasopharynx.
When inserted in the ear, EarPlanes ear plugs control the flow of air into and out of the ear canal, allowing the Eustachian tubes to function more normally and relieving discomfort.
A thick mucus starts to build up in your child's eustachian tube and middle ear.
In severe cases of congestion, doctors sometimes forcibly blow air through the eustachian tube to clear it out.
The back of the throat and the space behind the eardrum (middle ear) is connected by a tube called the eustachian (you-STAY-shun) tube.
TEMPORARY deafness following colds is not uncommon, particularly in children and is caused by the narrow eustachian tube that connects the middle part of the ear to the back of the nose becomes blocked, by a mixture of catarrh and swelling.
Chapters include the latest diagnostic methods for media otitis; recent studies of the anatomy and physiology of the eustachian tube; an evidence-based classification of eustachian tube dysfunction; new information on antibiotic-resistant microbes; vaccines for prevention; and management recommendations.
One typist turned the ear problem Eustachian tube malfunction into 'Euston station tube malfunction'.
The patient is unable to open a tube, the Eustachian tube, which connects the nose to the middle ear.