euphemistic


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Related to euphemistic: Elucidatory
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Synonyms for euphemistic

Synonyms for euphemistic

substituting a mild term for a harsher or distasteful one

References in periodicals archive ?
His description of the relationship between the two clubs as 'not much love lost' is heavily euphemistic.
Firstly, before you even get down to each individual house detail, I love the euphemistic language employed by estate agents in their adverts.
Democrats in Congress should also resist euphemistic formulas like ''phased redeployment,'' which really means trying to achieve with even fewer troops what Washington failed to achieve with current force levels.
In the city of Los Angeles, this all comes under the euphemistic heading of ``accounting.
Neil Goldschmidt had an "affair," a euphemistic term for committing third-degree rape.
My Welsh-speaking colleagues call them `hwrshops', literally translated as `whore shops', which is probably nearer the mark than the more euphemistic English name.
and experiences within the context of a four-month period of his life, Holappa's work falls under the somewhat euphemistic umbrella rubric of "life writing.
Thus the endless list of "whore-with-a-heart-of-gold" fables--from the euphemistic "show-girls" in Gentlemen Prefer Blondes to Julia Roberts's star-making performance in Pretty Woman.
Although their reports on environmental, health, and safety practices are written in euphemistic bureaucratese, they confirm that violations were serious and systematic.
Comfort women'' is a euphemistic reference to tens of thousands, perhaps hundreds of thousands of women from Korea and other countries who were forced to serve as sexual slaves for front-line Japanese soldiers during the war.
This can vary from cars, to pets, to the rather euphemistic sounding "business assets" mentioned on the manufacturer's website.
One only has to look at the language of boxing to see its origins in the often comic language of the criminal underclasses in London, where euphemistic terms for injuries often covered up harsh reality.
And then, Howard employs the kind of euphemistic language that she eschews in her book: ``I had a bit of a concern with one of my guides who became too familiar,'' she says, with understatement.
At last the parents involved in the hospital's organ retention scandal - a euphemistic term which doesn't come near to describing the appalling heartache involved - must at last feel justice is being done.