eudaimonia


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  • noun

Synonyms for eudaimonia

a contented state of being happy and healthy and prosperous

References in periodicals archive ?
In A2, Price attributes a circumscribed Platonic conception of eudaimonia (33) to Aristotle.
The shareholders also approved an Investment Subadvisory Agreement among MACC, Eudaimonia and InvestAmerica Investment Advisors, Inc.
44) Again, the absence of wealth and poverty makes possible the rule of the wise and promotes eudaimonia.
Although eudaimonia is usually translated as "happiness this is misleading if not qualified.
Eudaimonia Asset Management, LLC is a majority-employee-owned, small and micro cap growth investment boutique located in Encinitas, California.
Classical candidates include Aristotle's eudaimonia and Kant's good will.
On the contrary, for perfectionist consequentialists an action may be harmful for the agent's eudaimonia and be right at the same time as long as the consequences of such action are sufficiently beneficial to others ("Consequences" 19).
As most are aware, research in Positive Psychology is attempting to create a science of eudaimonia examining the associations between virtue and subjective well-being.
The texture of the good life and its pursuit will vary depending on whether one's vision of happiness is purification of the soul in preparation for an afterlife (Socrates's in the Phaedo), extreme self-denial for the sake of the state (Plato's Socrates in the Republic), or the attainment during one's natural lifespan of eudaimonia for oneself and those in one's larger social context (Aristotle's in the NE and Politics).
Theological virtue ethics acknowledges not only the moral virtues that are acquired through education and deliberate acts oriented toward the natural human good of eudaimonia (human flourishing), but also acknowledges that human efforts to lead a moral life are animated, purified, and elevated by God's grace to do good and avoid evil.
48) Considered from this perspective, this is not only a powerful warning--it is, at the same time, an expression of Epictetus' strongly optimistic outlook on our chances of reaching a virtuous life, that is, if we manage to cast away our vicious judgments, we will instantly have reached imperturbability, euroia and eudaimonia (Cf.
Love's telos--the intentional promotion of overall well-being--suggests an ethic of eudaimonia.
Though "Spirituality" is often included in the two dozen widely recognized character strengths of positive psychology (Peterson & Seligman, 2004), the movement as a whole promotes Aristotelian eudaimonia with little or no reference to God.
It can thus also be seen as a way of moving individuals closer to their telos and eudaimonia.
Reconsidering happiness: The costs of distinguishing between hedonics and eudaimonia.