etymology

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  • noun

Synonyms for etymology

derivation

Synonyms

  • derivation
  • word history
  • development of words
  • history of words
  • origin of words

Words related to etymology

a history of a word

the study of the sources and development of words

References in periodicals archive ?
From a pan-Samoyedic perspective, the Nganasan allative case has parallels in other Northern Samoyedic languages where one finds an etymologically related free-standing postposition.
Since the word "remedy" is etymologically unrelated to "medium," however, the conjunction is awkward, especially as Salis later attempts to conflate the terms to refer to social reform, writing that Gaskell "puts remedy to--she remediates--something which she clearly considers to be at fault in her contemporary society" (130-1).
It is significant that, etymologically, our companions are those with whom we share bread.
Sufi practice has often been depicted as a purification process, and Sufi scholars have noted that it's no coincidence that, etymologically speaking "Sufi" is connected to the word "safi" (pure).
BEING such a lover of words, I'm generally etymologically curious, and you'll be unsurprised to note that one of my favourite 'clever clever' jokes is 'what's the difference between an etymologist and an endomologist?
The longer group, entitled Kinneret, comprise a sort of cyclical poem--the title invokes the name of the Sea of Galilee (its name etymologically related to the word for "harp"--hence "Harp Lake" in the smaller group.
9) Etymologically, biblical tzara'at has been associated with "smiting", based on comparison with other Semitic languages, and it probably originated in a neutral medical term for the affliction of a skin disease like daleket (inflammation) or karahat (baldness).
Etymologically speaking, Maya Mazloum, head of academic studies and Arabic instructor at Eton Institute, said the word Jumeirah has two origins.
Etymologically the product of the Latin words 'carne' and 'vale', Carnival bids a somewhat ominous-sounding 'farewell to flesh', an allusion to the last few decadent days before the devout settle down to the pre-Easter weeks without meat.
Emotion, etymologically understood, will thus have to be accepted as part of the grammar of Black, (or any other) spirituality.
You could call them "amateurs," which to me is a fitting term, since etymologically it refers to people who love what they do.
Etymologically, the word Al Mariah refers to Marj, from which the word 'Al Marijah', developed to indicate a place where pastures, plants and various greens spread, along with various types of flora, wildlife and desert.
Etymologically, the word Al Mariah refers to Marj, from which the word EoACAyAl Marijah' developed to indicate a place where pastures, plants and various greens spread, along with various types of flora, wildlife and desert.
The root of burlesque, etymologically speaking, derives from the Spanish word burla (joke), and it is clear that Isabel de Velasco, in Picasso's rereading, makes a clear break with the suffocating strictures of Hapsburg court etiquette to join in the fun.
Etymologically, matter comes from an Indo-European word for "mother," the creator or origin of substance.