ethnology

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Words related to ethnology

the branch of anthropology that deals with the division of humankind into races and with their origins and distribution and distinctive characteristics

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References in periodicals archive ?
The recognition that the mainland United States was an ethnologically alien place for migrants resulted from the complaints of migrants during previous attempts to use Puerto Rican workers in U.
The Claims of the Negro Ethnologically Considered: An Address Before the Literary Societies of Western Reserve College.
the Russian term Rim (PHM) 'Rome'; the Polish term Rzym [zim] 'Rome'), thus Romanic people and Qin people are ethnologically related.
The phrase "the committee intends this definition to encompass only what is termed "primitive" or "tribal" indicates that the MOU's protection extends only to those materials that are ethnologically related to the indigenous pre-Hispanic culture.
According to this law, "the Government of Puerto Rico neither encourages nor discourages the migration of Puerto Rican workmen [sic] to the United States or any foreign country; but it considers its duty to provide the proper guidance with respect to opportunities for employment and the problems of adjustment usually encountered in environments which are ethnologically alien.
On the other hand, it was an instrument of governance adapted to the ethnologically perceived racial character of the colony.
The phrase "the committee intends this definition to encompass only what is termed primitive or tribal" indicates that the MOU would try to protect only those materials that are ethnologically related to the indigenous pre-Hispanic culture.
These colours represent the 11 players in every team, the 11 official languages of South Africa and the 11 tribes that make the country one of the most ethnologically diverse countries in Africa.
But Malmgren asserted that he had not come to this borderline by an arbitrary whim or comfortable trust in authorities but by a necessity of nature itself, because everything that was found westwards of this limit was both geognostically, zoologically and botanically, and even ethnologically, typical to Finland and Scandinavia, whereas everything eastwards was Russian or Siberian.
For a few, the non-nuclear issue of the 1980s still resonated, but more pointed out the significance, for New Zealand, of Obama's Pacific connections: he was born in Hawaii, which is geographically and ethnologically part of Polynesia.
The Baiyi zhuan describes (geographically, ethnologically and socio economically) many ethnic groups living in southwestern Yunnan and northern Burma.
Verdu et al (98) characterized genetic diversity at the MBL-2 genomic region in 1166 chromosome from 24 ethnologically well-defined populations.
What Cross fails to appreciate is that this mnemonic connection of "site" and "lore," the intertwining of sense of history with sense of place, is ethnologically astute and helps to construct the "inner consistency of reality" that was so important to Tolkien's overall program.